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U-Pol Before It Was U-Pol


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#1 pete l

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 07:10 AM

Hi all,

 

Did U-POL used to be called "David's Isopon" ????



#2 minidaves

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 07:16 AM

davids was a trade name for u-pol if i recall



#3 tiger99

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 11:38 AM

That was a very long time ago! I remember Isopon from about 1959 when my old man got his first car. Haven't seen it since about 1975.

#4 tiger99

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 11:39 AM

That was a very long time ago! I remember Isopon from about 1959 when my old man got his first car. Haven't seen it since about 1975.

#5 nicklouse

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 12:29 PM

I was using Isopon in the 90s

 

and you still can

 

http://www.halfords....easy-sand-250ml


Edited by nicklouse, 21 April 2017 - 12:30 PM.


#6 RooBoonix

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 12:38 PM

I've got a pot of P38 and P40 up the shed, seems like good stuff.



#7 r3k1355

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 03:34 PM

It's a good filler but it's more suited to bodyshop work where it can stay dry and get covered fairly soon, it's not great for home use.

 

It's a polystyrene filler with micro air-pockets, so when it drys these air pockets remain and can absorb water.

This is why everyone has issues with stuff rotting back through, they leave the filler to absorb water which then just gets on rusting metal once it's covered in paint.

 

There's loads of different fillers on the market, you can get epoxy based stuff that is more aimed towards home/DIY use.


Edited by r3k1355, 21 April 2017 - 03:35 PM.


#8 castafiore

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 08:18 PM

The filler most often recommended over on the Mig Welding forum is Upol Fantastic - seems to be used by the professionals, but only seems to come in very big tubs. I use the Halfords Isopon filler, but also use a Lechler stopper and Dolphin Glaze to fill the micro holes.

#9 RooBoonix

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 07:34 AM

It's a good filler but it's more suited to bodyshop work where it can stay dry and get covered fairly soon, it's not great for home use.

 

It's a polystyrene filler with micro air-pockets, so when it drys these air pockets remain and can absorb water.

This is why everyone has issues with stuff rotting back through, they leave the filler to absorb water which then just gets on rusting metal once it's covered in paint.

 

There's loads of different fillers on the market, you can get epoxy based stuff that is more aimed towards home/DIY use.

 

This must be why my Dads front wings are bubbling and mine aren't, he wet flatted the filler and I didn't. I just used more sandpaper as a result of keeping it all dry and clogging up instead.



#10 sonikk4

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 12:56 PM

Pro worx fillers are very good. Currently using their elite and it's a good finishing filler.

#11 r3k1355

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 02:59 PM

The filler most often recommended over on the Mig Welding forum is Upol Fantastic - seems to be used by the professionals, but only seems to come in very big tubs. I use the Halfords Isopon filler, but also use a Lechler stopper and Dolphin Glaze to fill the micro holes.

 

U-Pol, or whatever the parent company (3M?) are called have a large range of different fillers, but for some reason all retailers stock is the old rubbish thats been knocking around for ages.

IIRC IsoPon is what the American's call Bondo, both are just a brand name for a range of fillers.

 

 

It's a good filler but it's more suited to bodyshop work where it can stay dry and get covered fairly soon, it's not great for home use.

 

It's a polystyrene filler with micro air-pockets, so when it drys these air pockets remain and can absorb water.

This is why everyone has issues with stuff rotting back through, they leave the filler to absorb water which then just gets on rusting metal once it's covered in paint.

 

There's loads of different fillers on the market, you can get epoxy based stuff that is more aimed towards home/DIY use.

 

This must be why my Dads front wings are bubbling and mine aren't, he wet flatted the filler and I didn't. I just used more sandpaper as a result of keeping it all dry and clogging up instead.

 

 

Yea that stuff needs to be kept dry and not left hanging around, wet sanding isn't great for it.


Edited by r3k1355, 24 April 2017 - 03:00 PM.


#12 1984mini25

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 04:46 PM

 

It's a good filler but it's more suited to bodyshop work where it can stay dry and get covered fairly soon, it's not great for home use.

 

It's a polystyrene filler with micro air-pockets, so when it drys these air pockets remain and can absorb water.

This is why everyone has issues with stuff rotting back through, they leave the filler to absorb water which then just gets on rusting metal once it's covered in paint.

 

There's loads of different fillers on the market, you can get epoxy based stuff that is more aimed towards home/DIY use.

 

This must be why my Dads front wings are bubbling and mine aren't, he wet flatted the filler and I didn't. I just used more sandpaper as a result of keeping it all dry and clogging up instead.

 

 

Its also why you shouldn't use body filler to 'fix' rusty bodywork, apart from being a complete bodge. If and when the filler ever gets wet, normally from the back of the 'repair', it will absorb the water and then hold it against the metalwork forming yet more rust.



#13 RooBoonix

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 06:35 PM

 

 

It's a good filler but it's more suited to bodyshop work where it can stay dry and get covered fairly soon, it's not great for home use.

 

It's a polystyrene filler with micro air-pockets, so when it drys these air pockets remain and can absorb water.

This is why everyone has issues with stuff rotting back through, they leave the filler to absorb water which then just gets on rusting metal once it's covered in paint.

 

There's loads of different fillers on the market, you can get epoxy based stuff that is more aimed towards home/DIY use.

 

This must be why my Dads front wings are bubbling and mine aren't, he wet flatted the filler and I didn't. I just used more sandpaper as a result of keeping it all dry and clogging up instead.

 

 

Its also why you shouldn't use body filler to 'fix' rusty bodywork, apart from being a complete bodge. If and when the filler ever gets wet, normally from the back of the 'repair', it will absorb the water and then hold it against the metalwork forming yet more rust.

 

 

Who said anything about rust?



#14 1984mini25

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 06:46 PM

 

 

 

It's a good filler but it's more suited to bodyshop work where it can stay dry and get covered fairly soon, it's not great for home use.

 

It's a polystyrene filler with micro air-pockets, so when it drys these air pockets remain and can absorb water.

This is why everyone has issues with stuff rotting back through, they leave the filler to absorb water which then just gets on rusting metal once it's covered in paint.

 

There's loads of different fillers on the market, you can get epoxy based stuff that is more aimed towards home/DIY use.

 

This must be why my Dads front wings are bubbling and mine aren't, he wet flatted the filler and I didn't. I just used more sandpaper as a result of keeping it all dry and clogging up instead.

 

 

Its also why you shouldn't use body filler to 'fix' rusty bodywork, apart from being a complete bodge. If and when the filler ever gets wet, normally from the back of the 'repair', it will absorb the water and then hold it against the metalwork forming yet more rust.

 

 

Who said anything about rust?

 

 

You didn't. But one of the big problems with filler is it absorbs water. So if its allowed to get wet or water finds its way behind it, regardless of if it was applied over nice clean steel or over the top of rust as a bodge, once it gets wet, it bubbles up and rots out the panel beneath.






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