Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Radically Altered


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 Cameron2310

Cameron2310

    Just On Tickover

  • Noobies
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • Location: Cardiff

Posted 09 May 2018 - 10:19 PM

Really want to get a mini, they're cheap, parts are everywhere in comparison to other classics, and the price of insurance is (I'm not kidding) £4200 per year less than other cars that I've been looking at to restore but the huge problem I can see is the engine and transmition if I do get one. How many hoops would I be expected to jump through to register a mini if I put another non-standard engine in with other modifications down the line like better brakes, suspension and axles etc? The DVLA website is pish at explaining it and just directs me to look at form after form after form.

 

I've heard of people needing to do an 8 hour road worthy test, but that isn't mentioned anywhere on the DVLA website, just stuff about many different inspections... to make sure that the wheels aren't on backwards I assume.

 

Thanks for any info, this red-tape is a nightmare to deal with.



#2 Dannyboolahlah

Dannyboolahlah

    On The Road

  • TMF+ Member
  • PipPip
  • 40 posts
  • Location: Wigan

Posted 10 May 2018 - 07:06 AM

I believe its just a case of sending the V5 off to be changed. Sometimes theyll ask for an engineers/mechanics report confirming the engine number etc, sometimes they wont.
And then just inform your insurance company and give them some money.

The road worthiness (IVA) test only applies to kit cars and stuff.

#3 Compdoc

Compdoc

    Mini Mad

  • TMF+ Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 287 posts
  • Location: Northampton

Posted 10 May 2018 - 08:34 AM

I bought a Mini with a 1275 Metro engine fitted but details of the original 998 engine on the V5. So to keep everything straight, I applied to DVLA to notify them of a change of engine. It took 5 months to get it sorted, despite me contacting the previous owner and getting pictures of the engine, showing the engine number, in the original Metro donor car, showing number plates. The school leaver that I was dealing with just kept sending my old V5 back with no explanation. She would not respond to the email address shown on her first refusal letter and I could not get to speak to her on the phone. She finally suggested that I go to an "Austin dealer" and get them to confirm in writing that the new engine was indeed made by Austin and confirm the the engine number that I had stated was correct. I finally paid an MG/Rover specialist £25.00 to check the engine number and write me a two line letter on his headed paper.

How you would get on fitting another engine make entirely, I think would depend on which "Moron" at DVLA you are unfortunate enough to get.



#4 CityEPete

CityEPete

    Up Into Fourth

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,597 posts
  • Location: On my soapbox....

Posted 10 May 2018 - 08:35 AM

As I understand it it's all going to change in the next year or so.

#5 Cooperman

Cooperman

    Uncle Cooperman, Voted Mr TMF 2011

  • Mini Docs
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,391 posts
  • Location: Cambs.
  • Local Club: MCR, HAMOC, Chelmsford M.C.

Posted 10 May 2018 - 09:37 AM

Why would anyone want to buy a truly iconic classic car and then alter it so radically that it is no longer a true classic car, nor is it a modern car.
Surely a classic car is to enjoy retro driving as it was when your chosen model/type was built
The classic Mini is true 1960's/1970's driving and one with around 75 bhp is what the brand-leading Cooper 'S' was like to drive and enjoy back then.
When I drive my rally S it really is driving a 1960's rally car and the performance is interesting. It accelerates from 0 to 60 in about the same time as my modern BMW 730d, but it is so low geared that 7000 rpm is around 100 mph.
Of course, everyone must do as they wish with their own cars, but the thought of turning any classic car into a hybrid hot-rod seems a bit sad.

#6 r3k1355

r3k1355

    Speeding Along Now

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 415 posts
  • Local Club: East Anglia

Posted 10 May 2018 - 10:41 AM

Might not be a true classic though, might just be a late 90's Sprite or something.

 

No real crime ripping one of those apart and doing what you want with it.



#7 rich_959

rich_959

    Mini Mad

  • TMF+ Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 133 posts
  • Location: East Yorks

Posted 10 May 2018 - 11:03 AM

Might not be a true classic though, might just be a late 90's Sprite or something.

 

No real crime ripping one of those apart and doing what you want with it.

 

I agree. I mean, do things like Project Binky make sense? Probably not - there are far cheaper and easier ways to go quick, but you pay your money and take your choice. All part of the fun of a project.

 

So long as the early/special cars are not butchered of course!



#8 DeadSquare

DeadSquare

    Stage One Kit Fitted

  • Noobies
  • PipPipPip
  • 62 posts
  • Location: Herefordshire

Posted 10 May 2018 - 12:49 PM

Really want to get a mini, they're cheap, parts are everywhere in comparison to other classics, and the price of insurance is (I'm not kidding) £4200 per year less than other cars that I've been looking at to restore but the huge problem I can see is the engine and transmition if I do get one. How many hoops would I be expected to jump through to register a mini if I put another non-standard engine in with other modifications down the line like better brakes, suspension and axles etc? The DVLA website is pish at explaining it and just directs me to look at form after form after form.

 

I've heard of people needing to do an 8 hour road worthy test, but that isn't mentioned anywhere on the DVLA website, just stuff about many different inspections... to make sure that the wheels aren't on backwards I assume.

 

Thanks for any info, this red-tape is a nightmare to deal with.

 

 

Why do you think that the engine and transmition is "huge problem"?

 

The block might need a re-bore and the crank might need a re-grind, but all the parts go together like a Lego toy  (OK, like Meccano).  

 

Unlike restoring bodywork, they aren't rusty and don't need welding or painting.

 

Apart from the 'Traffic Lights Grand Prix' and overtaking, you cant use 120 Bhp in a mini.  On our roads, 80Bhp is sufficient and you have to be quite skilled to make full use of 100.

 

If you have set your mind on a CLASSIC car, the more you do to it, the less classic it quickly becomes.  There are subtle things that you can do to the suspension, maybe enhanced front brakes or an anti roll bar, which are easily reversible, but once you have skimmed 1/8th" off the head, you can't put it back.

 

If you can manage on a 110Bhp pittance the transmition is perfectly adequate and the larger bearings of a 1275 Gt engine leave it unstressed if lightly supercharged with the standard cam, and there is all that lovely extra torque.

 

A bonus is, that like adding four pot alluminium calipers, a supercharger is a "bolt on goody" that can be easily removed.



#9 rich_959

rich_959

    Mini Mad

  • TMF+ Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 133 posts
  • Location: East Yorks

Posted 10 May 2018 - 12:55 PM

 

Really want to get a mini, they're cheap, parts are everywhere in comparison to other classics, and the price of insurance is (I'm not kidding) £4200 per year less than other cars that I've been looking at to restore but the huge problem I can see is the engine and transmition if I do get one. How many hoops would I be expected to jump through to register a mini if I put another non-standard engine in with other modifications down the line like better brakes, suspension and axles etc? The DVLA website is pish at explaining it and just directs me to look at form after form after form.

 

I've heard of people needing to do an 8 hour road worthy test, but that isn't mentioned anywhere on the DVLA website, just stuff about many different inspections... to make sure that the wheels aren't on backwards I assume.

 

Thanks for any info, this red-tape is a nightmare to deal with.

 

 

Why do you think that the engine and transmition is "huge problem"?

 

The block might need a re-bore and the crank might need a re-grind, but all the parts go together like a Lego toy  (OK, like Meccano).  

 

Unlike restoring bodywork, they aren't rusty and don't need welding or painting.

 

Apart from the 'Traffic Lights Grand Prix' and overtaking, you cant use 120 Bhp in a mini.  On our roads, 80Bhp is sufficient and you have to be quite skilled to make full use of 100.

 

If you have set your mind on a CLASSIC car, the more you do to it, the less classic it quickly becomes.  There are subtle things that you can do to the suspension, maybe enhanced front brakes or an anti roll bar, which are easily reversible, but once you have skimmed 1/8th" off the head, you can't put it back.

 

If you can manage on a 110Bhp pittance the transmition is perfectly adequate and the larger bearings of a 1275 Gt engine leave it unstressed if lightly supercharged with the standard cam, and there is all that lovely extra torque.

 

A bonus is, that like adding four pot alluminium calipers, a supercharger is a "bolt on goody" that can be easily removed.

 

 

Solid advice. That's where I'm going with mine - a mild swiftune cam kit and lightened flywheel kit. A small amount of headwork at the same time as a general engine & box rebuild to make sure everything is nice and strong. X pin diff, maniflow LCB and system, K&N element etc. Then I'll have a solid engine with reasonable 'usable' power without having spent a fortune. And if I'm desperate for more power down the line, I'll have a good basis for bolting on a Vmaxscart supercharger kit or similar.



#10 CityEPete

CityEPete

    Up Into Fourth

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,597 posts
  • Location: On my soapbox....

Posted 10 May 2018 - 07:32 PM

Might not be a true classic though, might just be a late 90's Sprite or something.
 
No real crime ripping one of those apart and doing what you want with it.


That's what people thought about ripping mk2 escorts apart as they would never be worth anything, or butchering capris that were only a 2.0 litre version, xr2s etc etc

#11 Cooperman

Cooperman

    Uncle Cooperman, Voted Mr TMF 2011

  • Mini Docs
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,391 posts
  • Location: Cambs.
  • Local Club: MCR, HAMOC, Chelmsford M.C.

Posted 10 May 2018 - 10:50 PM

If one rips a Mini, or probably most other old classic cars, in order to try to achieve modern performance fron a 60-year-old design, it will cost a lot and the end result will be disappointing.
When buying a car the first criteria should be to ask yourself what you want it to do. Then look to see what you can afford that gets nearest to the desired performance.
What one doesn't want to do is buy an old classic car which doesn't meet the requirements and then spend a lot of time and money on butchering it.
I had the doubtful pleasure of driving a 1997 MPI which had been 'engineered' to take a Honda engine. It had cost thousands to do and although very quick in a straight line it was the nastiest car I can ever recall driving.
For the money spent the owner could have bought a great Subaru WRX which would have been much better and which is a modern classic.

#12 r3k1355

r3k1355

    Speeding Along Now

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 415 posts
  • Local Club: East Anglia

Posted 11 May 2018 - 01:05 PM

 

Might not be a true classic though, might just be a late 90's Sprite or something.
 
No real crime ripping one of those apart and doing what you want with it.


That's what people thought about ripping mk2 escorts apart as they would never be worth anything, or butchering capris that were only a 2.0 litre version, xr2s etc etc

 

 

All old Fords though.  Old Ford = Money.

 

Whats the going rate for a 1960's Escort??   Like £5000 for a resto project?  £10,000 for something abit tidy?

What the going rate for a Austin 1300??  Dick-all last time anyone cared enough to check.



#13 CityEPete

CityEPete

    Up Into Fourth

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,597 posts
  • Location: On my soapbox....

Posted 11 May 2018 - 07:05 PM

I'd actually quite like an ado 16 of some kind!

#14 Ethel

Ethel

    ..is NOT a girl!

  • TMF Team
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,246 posts
  • Local Club: none

Posted 11 May 2018 - 07:35 PM

This is intended to point you in the right direction.

 

You can do quite a lot as long as you don't start chopping and bending the bodyshell too much.

 

From the legality point of view I wouldn't be any more bothered about fitting an engine other than a transverse A Series. Besides the chopping, getting half usable gear ratios when you've reduced the rolling radius with dinky Mini wheels could be harder and more costly.

 

Minis can handle a lot more power than they were designed for. Whether you need more than can be got from well tested ways of tuning the engine they came with to get the maximum enjoyment is debatable. 



#15 Cooperman

Cooperman

    Uncle Cooperman, Voted Mr TMF 2011

  • Mini Docs
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,391 posts
  • Location: Cambs.
  • Local Club: MCR, HAMOC, Chelmsford M.C.

Posted 11 May 2018 - 09:04 PM

One of the best classic Minis in terms of driving fun is an 850 with a standard engine and transmission. It is the true iconic Mini and drives the way a 1960's car should.

It is retro-driving as it should be. All the charm, dreams and driving fun of those far off days are there in an 850.

i know that if I want to go fast, I get into my modern car which will give a 0 - 60 time of around 7 seconds and a top speed (in Germany) of 150 mph. It is doing 84 mph at 2000 rpm in 6th with smoothness, safety and reliability.

But if and when I want the fun of driving as it used to be I get into my Mk.1 and go out in the lanes. My Mini is worth many times what my daily driver is and will increase in value so long as I don't ruin it. The 1964 850 I am restoring will be equally iconic.

If you want modern performance and reliability, then buy a modern car. It will be far cheaper to buy/re-build, maintain and run than any old classic car.

If you want relatively slow retro driving, then you can't beat a classic old Mini.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Mini Spares