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Replacing The Wheel Studs On Disc Brake Drive Flanges


Best Answer nicklouse , 11 July 2018 - 12:12 PM

Depends on the brakes and the stud length.

 

often the big nut does not need removing in any version.

 

the only setup that needs the drive flange and the disc separating are the 8.4s

 

hammer to smack them out. and a hammer to put them in. where a hammer can not be used then you can pull them in with some spacers and a reversed wheel nut.

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#1 Vinay-RS

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 12:08 PM

Hi everyone, 

 

(I think this has been asked and answered before, but I was getting a bit confused when looking for an answer. )

 

One of the wheel studs snapped on my car two nights back (dodgy wheel nuts). The other was so weak that when I tightened it up it snapped too. Now I have replacement studs (and nuts for a steel wheel that I am going to use in the interim), I was wondering what the correct procedure was to remove the existing studs and replace them. I figure it'd be best to replace all 4 studs as the other two would have been loaded incorrectly when the studs broke. 

 

I've done the job on drums before, and the process was to remove the castle nut, the drum and then slide off the drive flange. 

On the discs, it looks as if the disc and flange are one piece (or are attached with little securing screws), should I remove the castle nut, then the caliper and then the entire disc? 

 

Thanks for the assistance, 

 

Vinay



#2 nicklouse

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 12:12 PM   Best Answer

Depends on the brakes and the stud length.

 

often the big nut does not need removing in any version.

 

the only setup that needs the drive flange and the disc separating are the 8.4s

 

hammer to smack them out. and a hammer to put them in. where a hammer can not be used then you can pull them in with some spacers and a reversed wheel nut.



#3 Vinay-RS

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 12:17 PM

Depends on the brakes and the stud length.

 

often the big nut does not need removing in any version.

 

the only setup that needs the drive flange and the disc separating are the 8.4s

 

hammer to smack them out. and a hammer to put them in. where a hammer can not be used then you can pull them in with some spacers and a reversed wheel nut.

Stock wheel studs (I think they're the smallest ones that you get), 7.5" discs. 

 

Cool, so it can be done with everything attached to the car? Just tap the top of the stud to knock it loose? 

How do I get a hammer between the disc and the flange though? 



#4 Icey

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 01:30 PM

I've just changed the 'standard' length wheel studs on ours, we have 7.5" discs and didn't need to dismantle the hub. Drift out the old ones (be careful if you want to reuse later), and I used an air ratchet (not an impact gun) to pull them in.



#5 Vinay-RS

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 01:41 PM

Sweet, I'll try this after work today. Hopefully it all works out :) 



#6 Cooperman

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 02:37 PM

Just slide the new studs in with a small amount of grease on the splines. Get a larger diameter nut to use as a spacer equal to the thickness of the metal on the wheel, then a washer and fit a wheel nut the opposite war around, tighten the wheel nut and the new stud will be pulled home.

Fit the wheel and tighten to the correct torque and this will ensure the new stud is seated. It is a good idea to re-torque after a few miles to be on the safe side.



#7 Vinay-RS

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 06:07 PM

Sorted. Swapped out all four studs. Thank you all for the advice! :) 






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