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General Safety Improvement


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#1 WillCarter

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Posted 04 August 2018 - 08:15 PM

So yes, I know that I'm driving a classic mini but at the same time, what are some changes that I can do to improve the safety of a mini? For instance, would you recommend moving the battery from the boot to the rear seats? (Back seats will be removed of course). 

 

I'm also interested in general tidying up and reliability improvements. 

 

Cheers in advance, 

 

Will 



#2 nicklouse

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Posted 04 August 2018 - 08:17 PM

nope.

 

just dont drive like a something.



#3 MacGyver

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Posted 04 August 2018 - 09:08 PM

Just my 2 penses worth, but a third brake light is the best thing I've fitted to my girlfriends mini.
She was ran into twice and both times they said: I didn't notice you where braking...
Most people now only look at the centre one and drive far too close to see the side lights anyway.

Ben

#4 unburntfuelinthemorning

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Posted 05 August 2018 - 10:57 AM

It's difficult to improve the passive safety of the Mini that much.  It would be safer to have a full roll cage with harnesses, a helmet and fireproof overalls but slightly impractical for everyday use.  Maintaining the vehicle in tip-top condition is obviously essential.  Fitting a high level brake light can help as MacGyver suggests as people notice this better.  Improving engine response, braking, handling and grip won't do any harm either.  Using headlights in conditions when the car is hard to see by others is useful too especially if your car is camouflage road grey!  I'm going to throw in using amber lenses for indicators as well as I find clear lenses with amber bulbs look good but don't show up very well in the daylight always.

 

The best thing to make life safer on the road is to develop your sense of what is going on around you.  Many people only react to problems once they perceive them happening - try to anticipate problems before they occur.  It is quite remarkable how often you can predict what someone is going to do in another vehicle before they even realise themselves.  Always leave a good gap between you and the vehicle in front.  Don't brake too suddenly when someone is behind you as they may not react fast enough.  Expect people to cross lanes on roadabouts for no apparent reason.  Keep calm and let it all wash over you - easier said than done sometimes!  Never stop learning how to drive - notice when you make a mistake and learn from it unlike my mother-in-law!

 

In some ways I find the Mini quite a safe car as you can often avoid trouble due to its small size and manoeuvreability.


Edited by unburntfuelinthemorning, 05 August 2018 - 11:00 AM.


#5 Homersimpson

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Posted 05 August 2018 - 11:04 AM

It's difficult to improve the passive safety of the Mini that much.  It would be safer to have a full roll cage with harnesses, a helmet and fireproof overalls but slightly impractical for everyday use.  Maintaining the vehicle in tip-top condition is obviously essential.  Fitting a high level brake light can help as MacGyver suggests as people notice this better.  Improving engine response, braking, handling and grip won't do any harm either.  Using headlights in conditions when the car is hard to see by others is useful too especially if your car is camouflage road grey!  I'm going to throw in using amber lenses for indicators as well as I find clear lenses with amber bulbs look good but don't show up very well in the daylight always.

 

The best thing to make life safer on the road is to develop your sense of what is going on around you.  Many people only react to problems once they perceive them happening - try to anticipate problems before they occur.  It is quite remarkable how often you can predict what someone is going to do in another vehicle before they even realise themselves.  Always leave a good gap between you and the vehicle in front.  Don't brake too suddenly when someone is behind you as they may not react fast enough.  Expect people to cross lanes on roadabouts for no apparent reason.  Keep calm and let it all wash over you - easier said than done sometimes!  Never stop learning how to drive - notice when you make a mistake and learn from it unlike my mother-in-law!

Although fitting  a roll cage to a mini is probably a good idea (apart from possibly hitting your head on it in an accident) you do need to be careful not to make cars too strong, what kills a lot of people in accidents is the sudden stop.  That's why modern cars have crumple zones to reduce the impact loading on your body, its a balancing act of keeping the passenger compartment in shape and absorbing and dissipating forces.

 

As above sensing other peoples actions will certainly help and of course you can tell that some types or cars will be driven by idiots!



#6 absx2

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Posted 05 August 2018 - 12:02 PM

I have retro fitted door bars to a few minis in the past, they were just a copy of rovers efforts but with two bars on each side.

They can be fitted without removing the door skin, just the winder and glass. Oh and you need fabricating skills :)

 

The other good advice I was recently given by a paramedic admiring my mk3 was to get some seats with headrests as he had the unfortunate experience of attending an RTA where the driver was hit hard from behind and suffered fatal and catastrophic head and neck injuries .

I`m far too old for boy racer seats now but 30 odd years ago I ran out of talent and rolled a mini at speed. It was like a pin ball machine in there !

Anyway crawled out of the car unscathed and every thing was folded around the quality bucket seat that had acted like a roll cage.

 

I followed a car yesterday full of very lost people on holiday doing a big of sudden lane swapping and just generally being in the way. there was a sticker on the rear window saying Smile you`re on CCTV.  I gave them plenty of room and didn`t go hurtling past like I normally would in a hurry to get home from work on my motorcycle.

I looked for but did not see a camera so i have to get some sticker to keep the idiots off my tail when i`m sticking to the speed limits in my minis, good safety addition a reckon.



#7 unburntfuelinthemorning

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Posted 05 August 2018 - 01:42 PM

A Mini will never absorb impacts as well as modern cars as seen in this crash test on Fifth Gear:

 

https://youtu.be/4RLhAPQHf60

 

However if that bothers you maybe you need to buy Toyota IQ.

 

As far as reliability improvements go, keep up with all the servicing and try to replace/repair things before they let go and don't leave existing problems to get worse.






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