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Mini Pickup Production History


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#1 mab01uk

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Posted 27 November 2018 - 11:17 PM

"The 1959 Mini Register know of 9 1961 Pickups in existence world wide. Production started last week of January 1961 for the Austin's and 2nd week of February '61 for Morris. They were built in batches of 6 at first then 12's building up to batches of 48. The launch was June '61. We know of 2 pre-launch Pickup's, an Austin in Switzerland from late April and a Morris from early March, next is the June London to Moscow Pickup 10MWL which is now in Japan. There were lots and lots of differences in that first year as well, we're learning all the time."

 

Below is from the now closed 'Mini Pick-up International' website using the Internet Archive Wayback Machine:-
http://www.minipickup.org:80/wiki

https://www.facebook...MiniPickupClub/

Mini Pickup Production History
Chronological development history from inception, January 1961, to the end of production, May 1983.

    1961 January: Launch of the Austin Se7en Pick-up and Morris Mini Pick-up (Chassis Number AAU7 87551 - Austin, and MAU4 91551 - Morris). Cost: GBP 360.
    1962 January: Austin Se7en version now called Austin Mini Pick-up.
    1962 October: Baulk-ring synchromesh progressively introduced (Engine Number 405271 - Austin, and 412992 - Morris). Windscreen washers, interior light and bumper overriders standard.
    1967 October: 998cc engine option introduced (with 3.44:1 final drive).
    1969 October: All models rebranded as simply 'Mini Pick-up' as apposed to 'Austin Se7en Pick-up' or 'Morris Mini Pick-up' and are now manufactured by British Leyland. Negative-earth electrics, mechanical fuel pump. Full width rear bumper replaced with twin quarter bumpers.
    1970 October: Ignition shield introduced.
    1972 February: Improved synchromesh fitted.
    1972 April: Split needle-roller bearings on idler gears.
    1972 December: Improved driveshaft boots and alternator standard.
    1973 April: Rod-operated gear change introduced to replace #magic wand# type.
    1973 June: Plunging CV joints on inboard end of new drive shafts.
    1974 February: Inertia-reel seat belts standard.
    1974 May: HS4 swing-needle carburettor and revised manifold, air cleaner and exhaust manifold fitted. Ignition timing altered.
    1974 June: Twin-silencer exhaust fitted.
    1975 October: 88 deg thermostat standard.
    1976 May: Twin column-mounted control stalks fitted, new rocker-switch type panel incorporating hazard lights standard, larger pedals from Allegro, ignition/steering lock from BL Princess fitted.
    1977 July: Padded steering wheel and handbrake grip from Austin Allegro fitted.
    1978 December: Re-branded as 'Mini 95', indicating the 0.94-ton gross vehicle weight (rather than payload). Rear light cluster changed to later 'trailer board' type.
    1980 November: Pick-up 850 discontinued.
    1983 May: Pick-up 1000 discontinued (n.b. possibly due to the introduction of the Metro van in late 1982).

Production Branding & Models
Branding and model naming convention by manufacturer.

    The British Motor Corporation Ltd. (Great Britain):

        Austin 'Seven Pick-up' 1961 848cc
        Austin 'Mini Pick-up' 1962-1969 848cc
        Austin 'Mini Pick-up' 1967-1969 998cc
        Morris 'Mini Pick-up' 1961-1969 848cc
        Morris 'Mini Pick-up' 1967-1969 998cc
        Morris 'Mascot Pick-up' 1961-? 848cc
    British Leyland Motor Company Ltd. (Great Britain):

        Mini 'Pick-up 850' 1969-1980 848cc
    Austin Rover Group Ltd. (Great Britain):

        Mini 'Pick-up 1000' 1969-1983 998cc
    British Leyland South Africa Ltd. (South Africa):

        BMC 'Mini Pick-up' 1961-1965 848cc
        BMC 'Mini Pick-up 1000' 1966-1969 998cc
        Leykor 'Mini Pick-up 1000' 1969-1971 998cc
        Leyland 'Mini Pick-up 1000' 1972 998cc

Production Figures
Cumulative production figures since inception, January 1961, to the end of 1977.

        Home sales: 39,951
        Export sales: 14,416
        Total UK: 54,367
        Percentage exported: 26.5%
        Overseas production: n/a
        Total Production: 54,367
    Total production figures by branding since inception, January 1961, to the end of production, May 1983.

        Austin Se7en/Mini Pick-up: 18,075
        Morris Mini Pick-up: 12,577
        Mini Pick-up 850: 12,130
        Mini Pick-up 100: 15,397
        Total: 58,179


Edited by mab01uk, 27 November 2018 - 11:27 PM.


#2 mab01uk

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Posted 27 November 2018 - 11:19 PM

For completeness here is the rest of the 'Wiki' from the old 'Mini Pick-up International' website:-

Chassis/VIN Numbers
Chassis/VIN numbers by branding and engine size from inception, January 1961, to the end of production, May 1983.

    Austin Se7en/Mini Pick-up (850)
        1961 - 1969
        Chassis no./VIN prefix: A-AU7
        Commencing chassis no./VIN: 87551
    Austin Mini Pick-up (1000)
        1967 - 1969
        Chassis no./VIN prefix: A-AU7
        Commencing chassis no./VIN: 1068001
    Morris Mini Pick-up (850)
        1961 - 1969
        Chassis no./VIN prefix: M-AU4
        Commencing chassis no./VIN: 91551
    Morris Mini Pick-up (1000)
        1967 - 1969
        Chassis no./VIN prefix: M-AU4
        Commencing chassis no./VIN: 1068001
    Mini Pick-up (850 and 1000)
        1969 - 1974
        Chassis no./VIN prefix: X-AU1
        Commencing chassis no./VIN: 101
    Mini Pick-up (850)
        1974 - 1979
        Chassis no./VIN prefix: X-KU1
        Commencing chassis no./VIN: 101
    Mini Pick-up (1000)
        1974 - 1979
        Chassis no./VIN prefix: X-LU1
        Commencing chassis no./VIN: 101
    Mini 95 Pick-up (850)
        1979 - 1980
        Chassis no./VIN prefix: X-KU1
        Commencing chassis no./VIN: 25448
    Mini 95 Pick-up (1000)
        1979 - 1983
        Chassis no./VIN prefix: X-LU1
        Commencing chassis no./VIN: 25448

Weight
Kerbside weight including water, oil, spare wheel, tools and a full tank of petrol.

    Front axle: 855 lb. / 387 kg.
    Rear axle: 514 lb. / 233 kg.
    Total: 1369 lb. / 621 kg.

Body colours
Body colours January 1961 to 196?

    Whitehall Beige
    Smoke Grey

Body colours 196? to 1965

    Whitehall Beige
    Tweed Grey
    Willow Green

Body colours and paint codes under Austin & Morris, 1965 to 1969.

    Whitehall Beige (BG4)
    Persian Blue (BU39)
    Everglade Green (GN42)
    Cumulus Grey (GR29)
    Damask Red (RD5)
    Snowberry White (GN33)
    Tweed Grey (GR4)
    White (WT2)
    Marigold (YL7)

Body colour, paint codes and VIN paint codes under British Leyland, 1969 to 1983.

    Antelope (BLVC7) - ???
    Aqua (BLVC60) - JMA
    Flame Red (BLVC61) - CMB
    Glacier White (BLVC59) - NMA
    Teal Blue 70 (BLVC18) - JMC
    Green Mallard (BLVC22) - HMD
    Harvest Gold (BLVC19) - ???
    Tundra (BLVC94) - HMF
    Mirage (BLVC11) - LMF
    Tahiti Blue (BLVC65) - JMP
    Damask Red (BLVC99) - CMA
    Cumulus Grey (BLVC19) - LMB
    Persian Blue (BU39) - ???
    Connought Green (GN18) - ???
    Flamenco (BLVC133) - EMC
    Sandglow (BLVC63) - AMF
    Java (BLVC208) - HAB

Trim colours
Trim colours January 1961 to 196?

    ???

Trim colours 196? to 1965

    ???

Trim colours and paint codes under Austin & Morris, January 1965 to October 1969.

    Seats: Tan or arizona beige
    Headlining: Pale cream
    Rubber mats: Dark grey

Trim colour, paint codes and VIN paint codes under British Leyland, October 1969 - 1983.

    Seats: Navy or black
    Liners: Navy or black
    Rubber mats: Black

Rear Lenses
Two different types of rear light cluster were factory fitted to the Mini pick-up throughout its production. The first, fitted between 1961 and 1978, was the stepped type, which had previously been fitted to the Rover P100 and is believed to fit other cars of the time (Alvis 3 Ltr TG & 108G Saloon (Graber body) 1956-7, Rover P4 and Armstrong Sidley Star Saphire & Limousine 1959-60). Also available with a red indicator portion for export markets.

The second type, were fitted when pick-ups were re-branded as Mini 95's in 1978 until production ended in 1983. Strangely, the rear quarter panel to which it mounts to was never altered to accommodate the new shape and size - making it look like the wrong lens has been fitted by mistake. These were also available with a red indicator portion for export markets. This second type of lens is commonly mistaken for another, almost identical, Lucas manufactured lens intended for use on trailers which has a clear section to illuminate the number plate.

A third type often seen is that fitted as standard to vans and estates. However, the slope of these units, which would make the reflector portion stand vertical on the sloping back of a van/estate, would force the reflector to point down when fitted to the rear of a pick-up. Legally, this would not be allowed. These units were most likely fitted as a replacement by owners when the correct type could not be sourced.

 In 2010 another option was provided when the owner of http://www.minipickup.org custom made a limited run of clear lenses. Made from polyurethane and with each one cast by hand they were an exact replica of the original lens with all the correct light reflection and diffusion patterns. Only around 10 complete sets were eve made, making these extremely rare.

24PQPsE.jpg    

Rear Bumpers
Two different types of rear bumper were factory fitted to the Mini pick-up throughout its production. The first, fitted from inception, January 1961, to 1969, was the one-piece full width bumper.

The second type, was the twin quarter bumpers that were already standard fitment on Mini vans and estates. These were fitted when pick-ups were re-branded as Mini Pick-up's in October 1969 until production ended in 1983, most likely to reduce manufacturing costs.

As the number of surviving pre-1970 cars declines full width bumpers have become extremely rare and fetch a hefty price when they are occasionally offered for sale. Fitment of the two types is not universal. The full width bumper has 7 fixing studs attached across it's length while the twin quarter bumpers have 2 studs at each end. Accordingly the flange at the rear, underneath the tailgate, has a different number of mounting holes according to which bumper the car was originally fitted with. On cars fitted with the full width bumper the flange is also lower down to allow the tailgate to be opened without restriction.

Tw3QvXf.jpg

Tilt Cover
Tilt covers were never fitted as standard to Mini pick-ups but were available as a factory optional extra throughout the entire production period. A complete tilt consisted of the frame, the canvas and the fitting kit.

Tilt covers provided protection from the elements to the otherwise exposed load bay and it's cargo. Although extremely rare, original tilt canvas and frame combinations are occasionally offered for sale. In recent times examples in reasonable condition have sold for in excess of £300.

The following additional information is taken from Somerford Mini's 'External Body Fittings' catalogue:-

The tilt was the only weatherproof cover officially available for the load area of the Mini pick-up - although flat tonneau covers are seen on pick-ups from time to time, they were never offered by the factory and have been supplied as aftermarket accessories or made by specialist automotive trimmers. Many mini pick-ups were not fitted with tilts from new, and these cars usually left the factory without the necessary brackets and sockets* to attach the tilt frame to.

Tilt cover colours originally included Willow Green, Tweed Grey, Whitehall Beige and Smoke Grey, but all apart from Whitehall Beige were withdrawn very quickly in the 1960s, so to see any original colour other than beige today would be a real rarity indeed. Tilts were never, incidentally, offered by the factory in black.

The spiritual home of the Mini pick-up tilt, like so many other components of the Mini, was the Longbridge satellite factory in Bargoed, South Wales. In the mid-1990s, the period before the closure of the Bargoed factory, a good rapport was built up between British Motor Heritage and factory staff which amongst many surprising finds and revelations in the factory resulted in the release for the classic car market of a large stash of new Whitehall Beige tilt assemblies which had been squirrelled away presumably since the early 1980s. At the time of writing there's still a few about, but if you want one you'd better get in quick.

At the same time the factory templates for producing the tilt plus a bulk quantity of Whitehall Beige material was also recovered and offered to the safest pair of hands possible - the Mini's foremost trim specialist, Newton Commercial.

7VumIye.jpg

Grille
Throughout their production Mini pick-ups were never to be fitted with any of the ornate chrome grilles that the saloons received. Instead, in the name of reducing costs, their 'grilles' were in fact specially adapted front panels with an arrangement of slots pressed into them to enable airflow to the engine compartment. However, as every original pick-up owner knows, removal of the oil filter is made somewhat more difficult with this type of grille.

Tonneau
Although commonly seen fitted to Mini pick-ups tonneaus (flat, fabric covers over the rear load area) were never fitted as standard or, like the tilt cover, as an option by the factory. Those subsequently fitted are either after-market accessories or one-offs by specialist trimming companies.

Miscellaneous
Mini pick-ups (as well as estates and vans) were built on track 10 of The Old West Works at Longbridge, a line specially equipped for their manufacture and the only line used for Mini production after 1997.
The rear suspension trumpets fitted to Mini pick-ups were slightly longer than those fitted to their saloon counter parts to raise the height of the rear load bay and provide more rear suspension travel.
A series of early press release photographs shows the rear load area of the pick-up without the stiffening panel connecting the rear wheel arch with the top rail of the rear quarter panel. It is not known whether the pick-up in the pictures was an early prototype and this panel was added before production commenced or wether very early pick-ups were manufactured without this panel.
Mini pick-ups exported and sold in Denmark were named and badged as 'Mascot' pick-ups. They were also fitted with wing mounted indicators and have decals on the rear quarters displaying load capacity and total weight as is the law in Denmark.

G4npnXq.jpg

Copyright Disclaimer
This wiki has been compiled by Jon Woodward, Bart Vanreusel and members of the Mini Pick-up International community using official promotional material, commercial printed literature and sources considered to be in the public domain.

Ice-cream Vans - The most famous ice cream Mini's are from the hand of Coachbuilders S.C. Cummuns Ltd (based in Crewe) and Whitby Morrison. After 15 years of specialist conversions, they started specialising in building ice cream vans in 1965. It didn’t take long to see the mini pick-up, one of the cheapest commercial vehicles available at that time, was the perfect base for doing this. It was in fact the first small sized model in which the operator could remain inside the car, where in other ice cream conversions, he had to step on the pavement to serve his customers. Therefore, the bulkhead and rear window section were removed, and the floor got some extra strength panels for compensation. The passenger seat was replaced by the refrigeration unit box. A sink unit was installed behind the driver and the freezer to the rear, being the typical layout for small ice cream vans. From the mid ‘60s to the mid ‘80s, two different Cummins models (part of the Whitby Heritage Colection) were produced; the flamboyant Batman version with the “ears” and 2 windows above the front windscreen, and the more common model with the rounded front. Both were constructed using glassfibre and aluminium perspex and glas windows. Ad the “Mind that child” or “Stop me and buy one” text traditionally emblazoned at the tailgate and you've got one of the coolest ice cream vans on the street at the time.

Hot Dog Vans - The Mini pick-up was also used for hot dog van conversions. Unlike the ice cream pick-ups, the rear window section stayed in place, and a back door was used to let the operator in. Safety reasons might have something to do with that, and the smell.. The hot dog van top also had a more rectangular front.



#3 mab01uk

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Posted 27 November 2018 - 11:21 PM

The article below is also from the now closed 'Mini Pick-up International' website and may be of interest:-

The Story of 10 MWL
On Saturday 23rd September 1961 the Mayor of Oxford, Ald. Lionel Harrison and Mr. E. A. Ferguson, a solicitor and former City Councilor, left Oxford heading to Moscow in a Morris Mini pick-up. Fitted with a special 50 gallon fuel tank their goal was to cover the 1900 mile journey without refueling.

The journey was conceived after a chance remark by the Mayor, one of the first people in Oxford to own a Mini, earlier that summer that he would like to drive one of the little cars to Moscow, saying: "I am very grateful to Morris Motors, which is Oxford's oldest 'big industry'. As first citizen I consider it my duty to do all I can to help Oxford's first industry. I have always had their cars and I think it is only right that all traders should do the same". The trip was planned in the main by Ferguson and was made possible by the co-operation of Morris Motors and, in particular, of Mr. J. E. Whitehead, the chief experimental engineer.

10 MWL (chassis number M/AUH/134510, engine number 12H/G35X/148) was first registered on 1st September 1961 and was standard except for the huge 50 gallon petrol tank which filled nearly half of the pick-up’s rear load bay area. Painted in Smoke Grey the only extras were a transistor wireless set, a Continental touring tool kit and second spare wheel. As well as provisions needed for the journey and a pile of books to read (one of which was titled 'Trouble With Your Car?') the pair also took 100 miniature models of the Mini saloon to give to Russian children.

The fuel tank was filled (photo below) and then sealed by Col. M. E. O'Gorman, the chief engineer of the R.A.C., and at around 12:05pm the pair set out from Carfax and drove to Southend where they were joined by their wives for the night before flying the car to Ostend, Belgium in the morning and driving onwards to Bonn, the West German capital. The following day they drove to Brunswick, Germany and the day after arrived in Poznan, Poland at around 7:30pm. On September 27th they reached Brest Litovsk, just inside the Russian border, before setting out for their longest and dreariest drive - the 480 miles to Smolensk. After a final day of driving covering 260 miles they reached Red Square in Moscow at around 4:00pm on 29th September.
After arriving in Moscow the pair drove to the British Embassy where the seal on the 50 gallon tank was removed by Commercial Counselor, Mr. Hilary King. By the end of the journey there were 1900 miles on the clock and 6 gallons of petrol left in the tank. They had averaged 43 M.P.G. over the course of the journey. Both men described the trip as "perfect" and stated that the only problems they encountered en route were accidentally killing a pigeon and the time Polish police had escorted them to the police station after excited crowds had mobbed them.

The mayor returned by air on Tuesday 3rd October after spending time visiting the Moscow State Circus and the Bolshoi Ballet while Mr. Ferguson drove the car back with Mr. Paddy Howells, a B.M.C. staff member.

After arriving back in England the pick-up lost its oversize petrol tank before being sold to the acclaimed automotive journalist and motor sport competitor, Gordon Wilkins, on 30th October 1962.

During the 70’s 10 MWL was owned by Joyce Wilkins as her first car. Joyce was a writer and the cover notes of one of her books, "Most Women Do It", shows a picture of her proudly stood in the rear of the pick-up (photo below). Sadly the car sat decaying in Joyce’s garage for over 10 years until, in 1986, she and her husband retired to Italy and the pick-up was sold
At some point during it’s subsequent ownership the car received something of a restoration including a respray in a sandy orange colour and being upgraded to disc brakes at the front to replace the standard drums, body coloured Cooper steel wheels and a Downton-tuned 1275cc A-series engine sourced from none other than Alex Moulton.

The pick-up re-appeared for sale at a car auction in Buxton in April 2007 with a guide price of £5000 to £7000. Auctioned with 22,000 miles on the clock and with a full years MOT it eventually sold for £5,280. Various newspaper clippings of the Mayors adventure were included in the auction along with the original 848cc engine, which was to be collected from Wiltshire.

In early 2010 it was again offered for sale, this time at Sherwood Restorations, a classic and sports car specialist in Nottingham. A year later it was exported to Japan where it is currently for sale in a classic car showroom in Tokyo.

nCcCUcF.jpg

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kii2S2i.jpg



#4 mab01uk

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Posted 27 November 2018 - 11:24 PM

It would be nice to still get brand new rust free examples still in their wax coating at these prices.... :lol:

Alsop's Garage, Newport in 1968 with a BMC sales forecourt of new unregistered Minivans at £475, a Mini Pickup and other BMC Commercial vehicles including the rarer 'Austin' versions of the Minor van all available at bargain prices.....

1968-minivans_zpse23aa1db.jpg
Photo: Heritage Commercials magazine



#5 KTS

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Posted 28 November 2018 - 10:56 AM

that is fantastic - thanks so much for posting this 

 

edit:

 

to add to the detail above, according to the BMH records, my '81 pickup was body colour Ermine with Black (Houndstooth) trim


Edited by KTS, 28 November 2018 - 01:31 PM.


#6 Retroman

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Posted 28 November 2018 - 11:38 AM

Brilliant posting a mass of good early info



#7 podifold

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Posted 28 November 2018 - 02:34 PM

Wow, this takes me back!



#8 Moke Spider

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Posted 28 November 2018 - 05:35 PM

Thanks mab01uk for posting up these gems.

 

I honestly don't know where and how you find all this stuff but I'm yet to read a dull posting for you yet. Maybe one day,,,,

 

I really liked these stories and in particular the run from London to Moscow on a single fill. It reminded me of a run I did once, but I'll save that for another day.

 

Sorry I'm a bastard for detail, but one detail that did grab me was this;-

 

The Story of 10 MWL
On Saturday 23rd September 1961,,,,,,,,,,,,,

10 MWL (chassis number M/AUH/134510, engine number 12H/G35X/148) was first registered on 1st September 1961 ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

 

I'm not sure if I'm reading this right and I may have quoted these out of text however, I read that as a 1275 engine that was fitted to this

Pickup in 1961 ????

Are you able to shed some more light on this?



#9 podifold

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Posted 28 November 2018 - 07:59 PM

An oversight when I wrote the wiki. 

 

 

At some point during it’s subsequent ownership the car received something of a restoration including a respray in a sandy orange colour and being upgraded to disc brakes at the front to replace the standard drums, body coloured Cooper steel wheels and a Downton-tuned 1275cc A-series engine sourced from none other than Alex Moulton.

 

 

12H/G35X/148 was the engine number it had later in life by the time I found out about it's existence at the auction in Buxton.



#10 podifold

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Posted 28 November 2018 - 08:18 PM

I did a lot of research into this car a long time ago as me and a friend were going to try and re-create the journey in my own pick-up. Unfortunately we never did. It turns out visa's aren't that easy to get for Russia if you're not the mayor of Oxford!

 

Anyway, using Google translate I even managed to get the garage in Japan to scan in the newspaper clipping that were still with the car and send them to me. As it turns out I still have them.

Attached Files



#11 podifold

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Posted 28 November 2018 - 08:24 PM

Here's the car as it was in Japan.

 

 

Attached Files



#12 Moke Spider

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Posted 29 November 2018 - 12:01 AM

An oversight when I wrote the wiki. 

 

 

At some point during it’s subsequent ownership the car received something of a restoration including a respray in a sandy orange colour and being upgraded to disc brakes at the front to replace the standard drums, body coloured Cooper steel wheels and a Downton-tuned 1275cc A-series engine sourced from none other than Alex Moulton.

 

 

12H/G35X/148 was the engine number it had later in life by the time I found out about it's existence at the auction in Buxton.

 

OK, cheers. I felt it must have been something like this. Thank makes much more sense now.

 

Ace story, really is ;D

 

Thanks for writing it up. Shame you couldn't re-create the journey as that would have made for an equally Ace follow up story.

 

A bit off topic, but I have a 60 litre (13.5 gallon) Main Tank and a 40 litre (almost 9 gallon) Auxilary Tank in the Moke, that'll take me circa 1000 km (625 miles) at highway speeds and about doubt that at suburban speeds, though it all comes down to how heavy that right foot is.



#13 Richie83

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Posted 29 November 2018 - 06:58 PM

What a great post. Thanks so much.

#14 Ben_O

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Posted 29 November 2018 - 10:09 PM

that is fantastic - thanks so much for posting this 

 

edit:

 

to add to the detail above, according to the BMH records, my '81 pickup was body colour Ermine with Black (Houndstooth) trim

I actually found 1 patch of Ermine White on your pick-up. It was under the l/h pedal box blanking plate on the front crossmember. Still clean and shiny too!

I can't remember if I told you that?

 

Cheers

Ben



#15 KTS

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Posted 29 November 2018 - 10:22 PM

 

that is fantastic - thanks so much for posting this 

 

edit:

 

to add to the detail above, according to the BMH records, my '81 pickup was body colour Ermine with Black (Houndstooth) trim

I actually found 1 patch of Ermine White on your pick-up. It was under the l/h pedal box blanking plate on the front crossmember. Still clean and shiny too!

I can't remember if I told you that?

 

Cheers

Ben

 

 

..did you leave it there for the sake of authenticity ? ...it's likely the only original bit on that car  :lol:






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