Jump to content


Photo

Engine Bay Rust


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 luismx123

luismx123

    Speeding Along Now

  • TMF+ Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 321 posts
  • Location: Graz

Posted 16 March 2019 - 04:32 PM

Hey all,

So whilst swapping my radiator today I saw how dirty the engine bay looked. I gave it a quick rinse with some degreaser and agitated it with an old paint brush. Then I saw this...

How bad is it, whats the best way to remedy the rusty surfaces without removing the engine? Im planning to give the car a complete respray in 7-10 years, but untill then I need it to not rust away from under me...
Im thinking of cleaning as much as possible by hand and then spraying some waxoil on the surface? Any tips/idea welcome

Thanks 

Attached Files


Edited by luismx123, 16 March 2019 - 05:55 PM.


#2 alex-95

alex-95

    I am THE CLAMP MAKER

  • TMF+ Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,560 posts
  • Location: Cornwall

Posted 16 March 2019 - 04:59 PM

I would cover the engine, remove any easily removable bits (like the tower bolt) get in there with a wire brush on a drill, then use some rust "curing" stuff and then paint it. You might want to cover the car with something as well.



#3 sonikk4

sonikk4

    Twisted Paint Polisher!!!

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,172 posts
  • Name: Neil
  • Location: Stone Cross
  • Local Club: EDMC

Posted 16 March 2019 - 05:24 PM

I would go a little bit more heavy than a wire brush in a drill. Now this is speaking from experience. Use a grinder with a twisted wire cup. You can get various types and they make a better job of removal than a drill and wire brush.

Still do as Alex said though and cover the engine. Remove components as much as possible to free up as much space as possible.

You can always use a Dremmel as well. Then use something like Bilt Hamber Deox gel to treat afterwards. Use an epoxy primer prior to paint.



#4 Stu1961

Stu1961

    Super Mini Mad

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 565 posts
  • Location: Stourbridge
  • Local Club: Still Looking

Posted 16 March 2019 - 05:27 PM

My bulkhead was bad, the biggest culprit in my case was the insulating foam that Austin deemed fit to introduce most definitely wont be going back in. Used Bilt Hambers Deox Gel on mine, removed 100% of the rust.



#5 MatthewsDad

MatthewsDad

    Speeding Along Now

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 347 posts
  • Location: Warrington

Posted 16 March 2019 - 05:49 PM

Just done a similar job. Good advice above. It's not too tricky once you've removed as much stuff as you can including the MC. Deox gel is really good.

#6 luismx123

luismx123

    Speeding Along Now

  • TMF+ Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 321 posts
  • Location: Graz

Posted 18 March 2019 - 08:37 AM

My bulkhead was bad, the biggest culprit in my case was the insulating foam that Austin deemed fit to introduce most definitely wont be going back in. Used Bilt Hambers Deox Gel on mine, removed 100% of the rust.

Exactly what caused mine... I think its only surface rust ATM as there is no sign of rust on the inside of the car... but yea.... Will definitely get sine deox gel and get the rust out .

 

 

Just done a similar job. Good advice above. It's not too tricky once you've removed as much stuff as you can including the MC. Deox gel is really good.

regarding the master cylinder... first off, what is it for, and is it just bolted down to the bulkhead crossmember or is there a pipe leaving the MC into the body? Im asking this as I would only unbolt the MC, lift, sand underneath as well as possible and then coat. I dont want to remove it if it would cause me to refill the fluids (never done that before) or have me do more then needed. Otherwise Id just tape it off, sand around, and move on

 

 

I would go a little bit more heavy than a wire brush in a drill. Now this is speaking from experience. Use a grinder with a twisted wire cup. You can get various types and they make a better job of removal than a drill and wire brush.

Still do as Alex said though and cover the engine. Remove components as much as possible to free up as much space as possible.

You can always use a Dremmel as well. Then use something like Bilt Hamber Deox gel to treat afterwards. Use an epoxy primer prior to paint.

Will try my best. My brother has a really small bosch hand held grinder and ill see if i can get some white brush attachments for it. Otherwise ill dremel/flap disc grind it out. 
Wouldnt it make sense to get a paint striper, apply and remove the paint, then hit it directly with deox gel as its mainly just surface rust? Just thinking of alternatives....

Thanks everyone



#7 sonikk4

sonikk4

    Twisted Paint Polisher!!!

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,172 posts
  • Name: Neil
  • Location: Stone Cross
  • Local Club: EDMC

Posted 18 March 2019 - 10:42 AM

 

My bulkhead was bad, the biggest culprit in my case was the insulating foam that Austin deemed fit to introduce most definitely wont be going back in. Used Bilt Hambers Deox Gel on mine, removed 100% of the rust.

Exactly what caused mine... I think its only surface rust ATM as there is no sign of rust on the inside of the car... but yea.... Will definitely get sine deox gel and get the rust out .

 

 

Just done a similar job. Good advice above. It's not too tricky once you've removed as much stuff as you can including the MC. Deox gel is really good.

regarding the master cylinder... first off, what is it for, and is it just bolted down to the bulkhead crossmember or is there a pipe leaving the MC into the body? Im asking this as I would only unbolt the MC, lift, sand underneath as well as possible and then coat. I dont want to remove it if it would cause me to refill the fluids (never done that before) or have me do more then needed. Otherwise Id just tape it off, sand around, and move on

 

 

I would go a little bit more heavy than a wire brush in a drill. Now this is speaking from experience. Use a grinder with a twisted wire cup. You can get various types and they make a better job of removal than a drill and wire brush.

Still do as Alex said though and cover the engine. Remove components as much as possible to free up as much space as possible.

You can always use a Dremmel as well. Then use something like Bilt Hamber Deox gel to treat afterwards. Use an epoxy primer prior to paint.

Will try my best. My brother has a really small bosch hand held grinder and ill see if i can get some white brush attachments for it. Otherwise ill dremel/flap disc grind it out. 
Wouldnt it make sense to get a paint striper, apply and remove the paint, then hit it directly with deox gel as its mainly just surface rust? Just thinking of alternatives....

Thanks everyone

 

 

No is the answer to the paint stripper. Basically this is fine for its purpose of removing paint but then just to cover the area in a converter will be a waste of time.

 

If you are not aware the basic bodywork of a mini is thin, 0.9mm and that part of the bulkhead above the crossmember is that thin. Now again speaking from experience here (have a look at Project Paddy in my signature) once its pitted it needs cutting out, but as a stopgap do what we have previously mentioned, a twisted wire cup in a small grinder will remove all of the surface rust which you will need to do no matter what with any converter.

 

If you do not do this it will rot out quickly. The crossmember is a lot thicker, a minimum of 1.2mm so can take a lot more abuse with regards to rust, however the same applies. You must remove all of the surface rust as far as possible.

 

Now your timescale of 7-10 years before a respray / resto is optimistic. My clubby looked ok and could have gone on for a couple of more years but there was rust lurking and the longer you leave it the worse it will get.



#8 luismx123

luismx123

    Speeding Along Now

  • TMF+ Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 321 posts
  • Location: Graz

Posted 18 March 2019 - 04:43 PM

 

No is the answer to the paint stripper. Basically this is fine for its purpose of removing paint but then just to cover the area in a converter will be a waste of time.

 

If you are not aware the basic bodywork of a mini is thin, 0.9mm and that part of the bulkhead above the crossmember is that thin. Now again speaking from experience here (have a look at Project Paddy in my signature) once its pitted it needs cutting out, but as a stopgap do what we have previously mentioned, a twisted wire cup in a small grinder will remove all of the surface rust which you will need to do no matter what with any converter.

 

If you do not do this it will rot out quickly. The crossmember is a lot thicker, a minimum of 1.2mm so can take a lot more abuse with regards to rust, however the same applies. You must remove all of the surface rust as far as possible.

 

Now your timescale of 7-10 years before a respray / resto is optimistic. My clubby looked ok and could have gone on for a couple of more years but there was rust lurking and the longer you leave it the worse it will get.

 

 

ok thats fair then. Ill see what I can do with the wire brushes. Worst case ill have to do it by hand if i cant get in deep enough...
its not pitted yet nor are there any flakes of rust anywhere. whilst scrubbing the paint just peeled off, and it seems really surficial (not sure if thats the right word :/)

What if i dont get around for the next few months... would it make sense to rub some oil on it to stop further ingress of fluids? just "seal" it for the time, then do a proper job once I find the time?



#9 sonikk4

sonikk4

    Twisted Paint Polisher!!!

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,172 posts
  • Name: Neil
  • Location: Stone Cross
  • Local Club: EDMC

Posted 18 March 2019 - 08:11 PM

 

 

No is the answer to the paint stripper. Basically this is fine for its purpose of removing paint but then just to cover the area in a converter will be a waste of time.

 

If you are not aware the basic bodywork of a mini is thin, 0.9mm and that part of the bulkhead above the crossmember is that thin. Now again speaking from experience here (have a look at Project Paddy in my signature) once its pitted it needs cutting out, but as a stopgap do what we have previously mentioned, a twisted wire cup in a small grinder will remove all of the surface rust which you will need to do no matter what with any converter.

 

If you do not do this it will rot out quickly. The crossmember is a lot thicker, a minimum of 1.2mm so can take a lot more abuse with regards to rust, however the same applies. You must remove all of the surface rust as far as possible.

 

Now your timescale of 7-10 years before a respray / resto is optimistic. My clubby looked ok and could have gone on for a couple of more years but there was rust lurking and the longer you leave it the worse it will get.

 

 

ok thats fair then. Ill see what I can do with the wire brushes. Worst case ill have to do it by hand if i cant get in deep enough...
its not pitted yet nor are there any flakes of rust anywhere. whilst scrubbing the paint just peeled off, and it seems really surficial (not sure if thats the right word :/)

What if i dont get around for the next few months... would it make sense to rub some oil on it to stop further ingress of fluids? just "seal" it for the time, then do a proper job once I find the time?

 

 

DO NOT USE OIL, you are introducing a contaminate that will give issues with applying paint later on. Believe me there will be pitting once you have removed the surface rust etc. As a stop gap you could apply a light coat of topcoat but give it a rub down first then brush the pint on. I have done this in the past.



#10 luismx123

luismx123

    Speeding Along Now

  • TMF+ Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 321 posts
  • Location: Graz

Posted 19 March 2019 - 07:45 AM

 

 

 

No is the answer to the paint stripper. Basically this is fine for its purpose of removing paint but then just to cover the area in a converter will be a waste of time.

 

If you are not aware the basic bodywork of a mini is thin, 0.9mm and that part of the bulkhead above the crossmember is that thin. Now again speaking from experience here (have a look at Project Paddy in my signature) once its pitted it needs cutting out, but as a stopgap do what we have previously mentioned, a twisted wire cup in a small grinder will remove all of the surface rust which you will need to do no matter what with any converter.

 

If you do not do this it will rot out quickly. The crossmember is a lot thicker, a minimum of 1.2mm so can take a lot more abuse with regards to rust, however the same applies. You must remove all of the surface rust as far as possible.

 

Now your timescale of 7-10 years before a respray / resto is optimistic. My clubby looked ok and could have gone on for a couple of more years but there was rust lurking and the longer you leave it the worse it will get.

 

 

ok thats fair then. Ill see what I can do with the wire brushes. Worst case ill have to do it by hand if i cant get in deep enough...
its not pitted yet nor are there any flakes of rust anywhere. whilst scrubbing the paint just peeled off, and it seems really surficial (not sure if thats the right word :/)

What if i dont get around for the next few months... would it make sense to rub some oil on it to stop further ingress of fluids? just "seal" it for the time, then do a proper job once I find the time?

 

 

DO NOT USE OIL, you are introducing a contaminate that will give issues with applying paint later on. Believe me there will be pitting once you have removed the surface rust etc. As a stop gap you could apply a light coat of topcoat but give it a rub down first then brush the pint on. I have done this in the past.

 

ok got it. Ill brush down as much as possible and if i get it done correctly, use deox, otherwise ill get a rattle can of a epoxy rust "converter"/ rust stop+primer that ive used before and spray the surfaces to temporarily hemn the rust till I can give it a proper sanding and paint!
What paint would be best? Epoxy primer+2k colour coating or would a basic 1k colour coat suffice? Im worried about the heat/exposure to oil/steam/etc inside there.... 



#11 sonikk4

sonikk4

    Twisted Paint Polisher!!!

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,172 posts
  • Name: Neil
  • Location: Stone Cross
  • Local Club: EDMC

Posted 19 March 2019 - 09:22 AM

Epoxy primer then a 1k rattle can topcoat. 2k cans are not cheap plus once you have activated the can you need to use it as it will go off in the can quite quickly.

#12 luismx123

luismx123

    Speeding Along Now

  • TMF+ Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 321 posts
  • Location: Graz

Posted 19 March 2019 - 02:28 PM

2k cans are not cheap 

unless you live close to one of the worlds largest suppliers ;)
I can get a can of mixed paint 2k for around 14€ 
 






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Mini Spares