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Torque Wrenchs


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#1 nicklouse

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 02:37 PM

Ok I am looking at replacing a pair of Sykes Pickavant torque wrenches that I have had for a long long time.

 

whats hot and whats not?

 

I will NOT be buying any that have a switch lever for direction change.

 

so looking at one 1/2 drive and one 3/8 drive.

 



#2 Steve220

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 03:16 PM

Nick,

Have you looked at the Halfords pro range? They don't have switches and have been pretty good!

#3 humph

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 03:19 PM

I have Halfords pro wrenches, they don't get heavy use but have been great so far. Lifetime warranty as well.



#4 Wiggy

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 03:36 PM

I too have 1/2" and 3/8" Halfords Pro Wrenches. They seem robust and the gauges are nice and easy to read in both Metric and Imperial.



#5 MatthewsDad

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 03:49 PM

Halfords pro for me too.

#6 Pete649

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 03:50 PM

I bought some Britool torque wrenches. Nice bits of kit. Then the first thing I went to tighten neither of them were suitable due to the bigger one being too long and the smaller one being out of range so had to use my old cheapo one again lol


Edited by Pete649, 11 April 2019 - 03:51 PM.


#7 yeti21586

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 04:02 PM

I've got Halfords Pro ones.

#8 jonsharman

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 06:01 PM

Before embarking on my project I asked the team in the Workshop at work (BMW Main Retailer) - the majority said Halfords Pro so that's what I went with.

#9 DeadSquare

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 06:37 PM

I recommend  "18G 372"  for the 1/2"  Torque Wrench.

 

I have had mine for 50 years and it is still accurate.



#10 Moke Spider

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 06:55 PM

Have you looked at the Warren and Brown range?

 

I have both types, a 'clicker' with a vernier type adjustment and also deflecting beam types.

 

I have to have them checked for calibration on an annual basis, had them many years now and they have not drifted from day 1, though I always make a point of backing the clicker off right after use.

 

After using both for a long while now, in many ways, I do lean towards the deflecting beam type wrenches. Some may say that they are not as accurate to set as the clicker types, however it does need to be kept in mind that tightening fasteners by a Torque method is at best only within 15% accurate and can be out by as much as 30%.



#11 hazpalmer14

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 06:57 PM

We used to have Norbar in work, from small stuff and massive stuff

#12 nicklouse

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 08:35 PM

however it does need to be kept in mind that tightening fasteners by a Torque method is at best only within 15% accurate and can be out by as much as 30%.

now that is an interesting thought.



#13 Moke Spider

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 09:11 PM

 

however it does need to be kept in mind that tightening fasteners by a Torque method is at best only within 15% accurate and can be out by as much as 30%.

now that is an interesting thought.

 

 

The figures I've quoted here are not to do with the wrench itself but the method and what's trying to be achieved.

 

For most Automotive fasteners, this band of tolerance is fine though.

 

Download the ARP Catalogue and have a read, I'm sure you'll find the tech bits in it enlightening.



#14 nicklouse

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 09:38 PM

 

 

however it does need to be kept in mind that tightening fasteners by a Torque method is at best only within 15% accurate and can be out by as much as 30%.

now that is an interesting thought.

 

 

The figures I've quoted here are not to do with the wrench itself but the method and what's trying to be achieved.

 

For most Automotive fasteners, this band of tolerance is fine though.

 

Download the ARP Catalogue and have a read, I'm sure you'll find the tech bits in it enlightening.

 

i am aware of the ARP measuring tools.

 

yep agree about the fasteners which makes you think about the tolerances stated for the wrench readings. +- 3% etc.....

 

still looks like i will be getting 3 new wrenches to cover what i need but that will still leave on bolt i will need to borrow a tool for one bolt (not on the Mini).



#15 Moke Spider

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Posted 12 April 2019 - 12:05 AM

 

 

 

however it does need to be kept in mind that tightening fasteners by a Torque method is at best only within 15% accurate and can be out by as much as 30%.

now that is an interesting thought.

 

 

The figures I've quoted here are not to do with the wrench itself but the method and what's trying to be achieved.

 

For most Automotive fasteners, this band of tolerance is fine though.

 

Download the ARP Catalogue and have a read, I'm sure you'll find the tech bits in it enlightening.

 

 

i am aware of the ARP measuring tools.

 

yep agree about the fasteners which makes you think about the tolerances stated for the wrench readings. +- 3% etc.....

 

still looks like i will be getting 3 new wrenches to cover what i need but that will still leave on bolt i will need to borrow a tool for one bolt (not on the Mini).

 

 

 

In regards to referring to ARP's Catalogue, it wasn't so much to look at their blister packed tools but to get some better knowledge of fasteners and methods of tightening them. While they don't discuss Nylocs and other self locking fasteners, all the same, it's clear from the engineering info that applying a torque wrench to these types of fasteners is rather pointless.

 

 

In regards to the accuracy of the method of using a torque wrench, I found the table I was looking for;-

 

1ewX38P.jpg

 

That's from a Fastener Manufacturer (Socket Heads Australia).

 

This is NOT to suggest using a torque wrench is a poor method, it's fine but needs to be put in to perspective and going to the n'th with this method isn't worth tying one's self up in knots over.






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