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50 Years Since First Moon Landing - 20Th July 1969


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#31 xrocketengineer

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Posted 13 August 2019 - 12:19 AM

Here is some interesting information about the Van Allen belts and Apollo. I am just posting the info, I am not an expert on the subject.

 

https://www.popsci.c...an-allen-belts/



#32 hhhh

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Posted 15 August 2019 - 12:30 AM

Here is some interesting information about the Van Allen belts and Apollo. I am just posting the info, I am not an expert on the subject.

 

https://www.popsci.c...an-allen-belts/

Thanks for the article. I think they're conveniently neglecting the hostile atmosphere that exists on the other side of the belts, which, during a solar storm, can kill. At any time, assaults by random cosmic micro-particles can cause serious health damage. Also, the last sentence reeks of hyperbole: "Flying to the Moon, radiation exposure included, was still a safer day at the office than putting an experimental aircraft through its paces in the skies above Edwards Air Force Base."



#33 xrocketengineer

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Posted 15 August 2019 - 02:20 AM

They might have been running on luck 

 

 

Here is some interesting information about the Van Allen belts and Apollo. I am just posting the info, I am not an expert on the subject.

 

https://www.popsci.c...an-allen-belts/

Thanks for the article. I think they're conveniently neglecting the hostile atmosphere that exists on the other side of the belts, which, during a solar storm, can kill. At any time, assaults by random cosmic micro-particles can cause serious health damage. Also, the last sentence reeks of hyperbole: "Flying to the Moon, radiation exposure included, was still a safer day at the office than putting an experimental aircraft through its paces in the skies above Edwards Air Force Base."

 

They might have been running on luck beyond the Van Allen belts. But keep in mind that radiation damage is based on intensity of the exposure and the duration of the exposure. These days there are more observations of the Sun to try to predict Solar Flares and warn the astronauts on the International Space Station or future missions of the imminent danger. Still, there is danger.

 

https://www.nasa.gov...lar-cosmic-rays

 

Another interesting thing is that the astronauts can actually "see" the cosmic rays:

 

https://curiosity.co...rays-curiosity/



#34 hhhh

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Posted 16 August 2019 - 12:49 AM

Interesting stuff; the video at your link entitled "Watch And Learn: Our Favorite Content About Space Radiation" is interesting. They state that 10-15 cm of water or polyethylene is a minimum for radiation protection in the hostile environment outside low Earth orbit, but even that won't protect against high energy particles. To say the least, it strains credulity that all the Apollo astronauts suffered zero effects from these particles. A link I posted previously gets into the probabilities over the Apollo missions. The odds were, astronomical, so to speak.

 




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