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Knowing When You're Defeated


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#1 pusb

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 10:33 AM

I should be nearing the end of my restoration by now. But I have seriously had enough.

 

 

I am fed up of new parts that don't fit properly

 

Simple but tricky things that I seem to find near impossible (perhaps its just me)

 

Running out of cash

 

Not having enough time to commit to it

 

Thinking I don't have the skills to finish it

 

Worry that I've missed something major and when I'm back on the road it will be a death trap

 

 

Its not supposed to be like this. I used to enjoy working on the Mini but now its just become stressful and a chore. I know deep down that I will never finish it.

 

So I am feeling now that my two options are:

 

* Get a restoration company to finish it off

 

* Sell it as a project for someone else to finish off

 

Bodywork and paintwork is all complete (although has 2 scratches caused by myself). Suspension is mostly complete and fitted. I have all the interior, windows, seals etc. I have accumulated most of the parts needed. Interior is all present and just needs fitting (seats need to be recovered but I have the period correct seat covers, wiring is fitted, needs engine fitting which needs some work on the clutch and differential.

 

Has anyone else on here found themselves in this position before when restoring? 



#2 SuperDeLuxeNick

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 10:35 AM

stick it back in garage, cover it up, have a break.

 

come back in a week, a month or a year.

 

You'll regret it otherwise!

 

Good luck though,



#3 cal844

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 10:41 AM

stick it back in garage, cover it up, have a break.

come back in a week, a month or a year.

You'll regret it otherwise!

Good luck though,


I agree with this, have some time away from the car. We used to do every second weekend and a few hours during the week.

Take your time and have plenty beer

#4 panky

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 11:04 AM

I haven't touched my Morris Minor Traveller for over a year because I was fed up finding rot, mistakes I made, escallating costs and exasperation in finding all the botches the previous 'resorer' had done. But recently, after looking back at everything I've done, I've been getting the urge to jump back in again. So once Christmas is over it will be on with the thermal overalls, fire up the mig and start sticking panels back on again, actually looking forward to it. So yes take a break and forget the car for a while - you'll get you're mojo back and soon you will have a car to be proud of.

Keep the faith :highfive:  



#5 sonikk4

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 11:14 AM

I have not done anything really constructive to Paddy for the best part of a year now as work has taken a major part of my time.

Now I have started the the bottom end rebuild buying a stack of parts to move fwd with this I am feeling more motivated to move fwd with it.

I do understand where you are coming from with regards to cost as now everything I have left to do is going to be expensive and my total budget has gone on the engine.

Plus winter time is probably the worst time to feel motivated with your build. Sit back, take a break from it all, consolidate your finances, review your expectations then move from there.

Don’t give up, just take a break from it all.



#6 dodge44

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 11:18 AM

After a major strip down to renew bodywork it took five years to reassemble my Triumph Herald after the rolling body shell returned from the paint shop so can sympathise here. Trouble is, when you have a fully tip-top shell it doesn't feel right putting scruffy or poor items back on it so you find yourself either stripping down and refinishing existing items or replacing perfectly 'serviceable' items because it seems the right thing to do. As others have said, but a cover on it for now and give it a break for while. When you return, come with a plan - I found that making lists of related tasks and working through those lists ticking them off as you finish them was remarkably therapeutic as you come away with a sense of achievement when that area is done even if in the bigger picture you still have a long way to go. May not work for everyone but it's the sense of accomplishment that drives you on and even little battles won can be encouraging. The other advantage of breaking down tasks and going through them one by one rather than a scatter bomb approach is you only buy what you immediately need so the cost is spread out. Good luck!



#7 Chris1275gt

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 11:36 AM

Don't get rid of it. If you do you'll be back on here in 10 years time with this post:-

Does any know where mini reg no blah blah blah is I wish I'd never sold it!

#8 Jase

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 02:11 PM

I agree with all of the comments above. What I would say is that I was in a very simialr situation a few years ago, had lost interest. Putting it to oneside also gave me time to get back into it. I also looked at your thread which also inspired me, I normally only look at the GT stuff (sorry) but as you can see I also commented on your thread so thank you - don't give up.

 

Jason



#9 surfblue

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 03:08 PM

Don't get rid of it. If you do you'll be back on here in 10 years time with this post:-

Does any know where mini reg no blah blah blah is I wish I'd never sold it!

 

Or... I cant believe how much mini projects are selling for these days..wish I hadnt sold mine now.....

 

Look, the hard work is done, the bodywork and the paintwork that's the biggest headache.

You are going well with the suspension and the loom is in.

Id take a break, then, break the remaining work required down into segments and tick them off as you go,

ie. front seats, do one a weekend. Strip one seat on a Saturday, give it a rub down and a coat of paint, rebuild it on a Sunday then leave it alone for a week and do the other one the following weekend so in two weeks you have half of your seats done.  :D

 

Parts can be expensive, unfortunately that's cars for you but buy only what you really need to. If a part you already have is servicable, give it a sanding down and a lick of paint, search the Bay of E for decent secondhand parts, put up wanted posts on here, most of us have mini parts squirreled away in our garages and sheds (and parent's roofspaces  :shy: ) that our better halves would be glad to see the back of.

 

Its early Novemeber, are you really in a rush to get in on the road in time for winter? So much nicer bringing a freshly restored car out onto the roads in late spring when the worst of the weather is (hopefully) over and the salt is off the roads, then you get the best opportunity to enjoy it.

 

With regards to safety, be methodical and sensible. If a safety critical part needs replacing eg. a flexi hose, replace it. If something has a specific torque, torque it and check it twice.

Your car will need an MOT (or maybe not depending on age?) but take it for one anyway. Tell the tester its just been rebuilt and ask them to give it a good going over pointing out any defects major, minor . Your are not trying to just scrape a pass, you want to be sure your car is safe.

 

I think we all go through times when working at old cars is a chore but unless its your only mode of transport and needs to be on the road, leave it until you feel like doing it again.

 

You wont regret it and the first warm day you're out driving along your favourite road with the windows open you'll look back and think all the aggro was worth it. (Almost talking myself into a restoration here!)


Edited by surfblue, 09 November 2019 - 03:10 PM.


#10 Cooperman

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 03:45 PM

As above, We've all been there at some time(s). I know I have. 

It sounds as though you have done the hard parts, such as fitting sub-frames, suspension, wiring, etc. The engine & gearbox are the easy bits a nd fitting the engine is straightforward. Then it's just the final bits & pieces like trim and seats.

Don't give up!



#11 wreckitralph

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 03:47 PM

ime on the bodywork stage of a very rotten mini even tyhe roof will be replace i prbably should have started with abetter shell but its what i have  and  it will be done  i havent set a deadline i think thats just pressure i dont need its meant to be enjoyable  so by not putting deadlines its helped its been 3 mths since i touched it last up until this time but when i walk in and see the new metal i do think thats a nice job maybe just  certain section  but thats how i keep imotivation   your way way ahead of me



#12 Magneto

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 04:59 PM

I agree with those who suggest making lists - while it may look daunting at first - every time you check something off you'll feel that you're making progress and soon the list will be smaller and smaller.

 

Another thing lists do is focus you on what you need to buy parts wise, then if you come across a deal you can snap it up and add to your pile. As you progress, that pile of parts gets smaller and smaller, again reinforcing that you're making progress.

 

So put down the tools and grab pencil and paper - start going over the car and make a realistic list of everything that needs to be done - right up to putting gas in and turning the key. If nothing else, you'll have a proper idea of what needs to be done to pass along with the car if you do sell it. If you find something you made a mistake on note it down so you can correct it and don't forget it and have to redo even more later o in the build. (Nothing more frustrating that having to drain and remove the fuel tank because you forgot to tighten the upper shock nuts for example)

 

The more detailed the list, the more things that will get checked off once you get into it again. 

 

I find when tackling a really big job breaking it down into very small bits allows me to work on it in spurts, and I don't forget something important - or I'm reassured that I did that part already and it's done right. I also keep a record of how may hours I work at a time and what I did each day - especially important if working on someone else's car but helpful to you too.



#13 Moke Spider

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 05:00 PM

With the bodywork and paint now done, to me, most of the hard work and some of the bigger ticket items are out of the way. The interior can be a fiddle (and why I now don't do restorations on Minis), but the rest is more or less 'just nuts and bolts'.

 

I hear you on parts not fitting or of poor quality, it's a sad state of affairs, but as it's all low volume now days, this is where we find ourselves. There is still all the quality and fit etc in parts out there, while I do tend to get probably 85 - 90% from one supplier, the other bits I find I need to go to several suppliers for, some of these are in the US and some in Japan.



#14 surfblue

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 05:11 PM

 

The interior can be a fiddle (and why I now don't do restorations on Minis)

 

Moke interior trim not too taxing!  ;D

 

 

I hear you on parts not fitting or of poor quality, it's a sad state of affairs, but as it's all low volume now days, this is where we find ourselves.

 

At least we have a choice and mini parts are plentiful, other than VW Beetles and MGBs and Midgets there are not too many classic cars with such a supply chain.



#15 Cooperman

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 07:31 PM

We are indeed fortunate that we can at least get parts, even if they don't fit too well.

Imagine trying to get parts for, say, a 1962 Sunbeam Rapier (a car I have always fancied owning) or a Standard Vanguard. It is almost impossible and if you do find some they are very expensive.

The skill comes in making the parts fit well. That is now a part of classic car restoration.






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