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Finishing A Paint Job, Dealing With Orange Peal

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#1 Oli_Bell

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 08:38 PM

Hi Guys, Please can you help?

 

Im back working on my Mk4 1979 after about 5 years in the garage, I know terrible. Its was resprayed a bright red (BLVC 590 Monza Red) a few years back and now I want to finish the paintwork and make her beautiful and shiny. 

 

I've done a load of research and think I know the process but just wanted to clarify with the experts. The paint job seems to be ok but I'm left with what looks like orange peal over the whole car. almost like loads of dull dimples. see the attached photos.

 

The process, I think goes like this:

  1. Clean the car of all dirt
  2. Wet sand with soapy 2000, 1500, 1200 then reverse
  3. Buff with a G3 compound and an orbital buffer
  4. Buff with G10 and an orbital buffer

 

Does this sound right?

 

Any tips from you guys?

 

is there any products i can buy to make the sanding easier?

 

Also there are a few chips on there where I put the engine back in and other minor chips in non obvious places. Can these be easily sorted out with a can of Monza Red aerosol?

 

Any suggestions here?

 

Sorry there are so many questions. I appreciate all your feedback.

Attached Files


Edited by Oli_Bell, 24 June 2015 - 08:43 PM.


#2 sonikk4

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 08:40 PM

To be honest i would go in with 2000 to start with.

 

G3 followed by for me Scholl Concepts S17+ then a polish of your choice. Touching up stonechips etc i would use a fine bristle brush and then build up layers of paint. then flat back.



#3 myredmini

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 08:50 PM

Personally for best results, p1500 on the DA sander  (dry) or 2000 wet and dry (wet), then finish with a P3000 trizact pad (use soapy water with this) then use a 3m compounding mop with some g6 compound. Once the paint is compounded up a finer polish can be used for the final detailing. 

 

I paint cars for a living so I know it works  ;D

 

20140926_162436_zpszqhpttnu.jpg

 

20140923_163450_zpsiz5vsxsi.jpg

 

20140923_163329_zpsejiopm4f.jpg



#4 Oli_Bell

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 09:07 PM

Thanks guys,

 

Im a bit concerned about using a sander or any other high powered tool for the job. :ohno:  :wacko:

 

Do you need a lot of skill and precision to not wreck the paint work?



#5 Carlos W

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 09:13 PM

Thanks guys,

 

Im a bit concerned about using a sander or any other high powered tool for the job. :ohno:  :wacko:

 

Do you need a lot of skill and precision to not wreck the paint work?

You need to keep it moving certainly.

 

I've machine polished some expensive cars, and the key was to keep it wet



#6 myredmini

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 09:14 PM

Its going to depend alot on how much paint is on the car. Could easily burn through by hand or machine. Do you know how many coats of paint were applied and wet they were applied?

#7 Oli_Bell

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 09:21 PM

 Do you know how many coats of paint were applied and wet they were applied?

 

Unfortunately not. It was cheep. The guy even ran out of masking tape so sprayed the windows also, and the engine bay.



#8 Oli_Bell

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 09:33 PM

Personally for best results, p1500 on the DA sander  (dry) or 2000 wet and dry (wet), then finish with a P3000 trizact pad (use soapy water with this) then use a 3m compounding mop with some g6 compound. Once the paint is compounded up a finer polish can be used for the final detailing. 

 

 

 

 

Do the trizact pads go onto a normal DA sander?



#9 Ben_O

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 10:18 PM

 

Personally for best results, p1500 on the DA sander  (dry) or 2000 wet and dry (wet), then finish with a P3000 trizact pad (use soapy water with this) then use a 3m compounding mop with some g6 compound. Once the paint is compounded up a finer polish can be used for the final detailing. 

 

 

 

 

Do the trizact pads go onto a normal DA sander?

 

yes they do.

 

If you are concerned about flatting back by machine, then do it by hand, it's not too much bother, just keep the paper and paint wet and soapy to avoid friction and use the paper on a rubber block to keep everything nice and flat. I like to use the edge of the rubber block as a squeegee regularly during sanding to keep tabs on how far you are going and then stop as soon as the paint is flat and uniform.

 

Good luck!

 

Ben 


Edited by Ben_O, 24 June 2015 - 10:18 PM.


#10 bluedragon

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 11:18 PM

yes they do.

 

 

Do the trizact pads go onto a normal DA sander?

 

 

If you are concerned about flatting back by machine, then do it by hand, it's not too much bother, just keep the paper and paint wet and soapy to avoid friction and use the paper on a rubber block to keep everything nice and flat. I like to use the edge of the rubber block as a squeegee regularly during sanding to keep tabs on how far you are going and then stop as soon as the paint is flat and uniform.

 

Good luck!

 

Ben 

 

 

 

 I second this advice, especially if you're not sure about the depth or quality of the paint job. Probably 10-15 years ago, almost all color sanding was done by hand anyway, but I think there have been technological advances since then. Many custom painters will still use hand sanding. It just takes time, but then that's the standard do it yourself tradeoff - time for money.



#11 myredmini

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Posted 25 June 2015 - 11:57 AM

As Ben says take it easy with a block and wet and dry if the paint film thickness is unknown and you should be fine. I still use this technique on roofs and large bonnets, jaguar etypes been the main one.





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