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Are Big End Bearings Expensive/difficult To Change?

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#16 Carlos W

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Posted 30 January 2016 - 04:28 PM

Depending on what you're having done to the head, it could increase the load on an already worn out engine.

 

Engine hoists can be borrowed or hired.



#17 carbon

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Posted 30 January 2016 - 06:37 PM

+1 for Ethel's suggestions.

 

If bigends are worn you normally see lower oil pressure.



#18 WimpyMiniMan

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Posted 30 January 2016 - 07:11 PM

In my experience shot big ends are very predictable and worse under load, you can almost play a tune on them using the accelerator. If they are bad enough to knock I wouldn't be expecting to cure them by just fitting new shells.
 
Have you investigated other possibilities? Is the knock related to engine or road speed, does it happen out of gear or with the clutch in? Does engine temperature make any difference, what's your oil pressure like?



The knocking stops when I put the clutch down or when I put the engine under load.

Edited by WimpyMiniMan, 30 January 2016 - 07:12 PM.


#19 WimpyMiniMan

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Posted 30 January 2016 - 07:16 PM

Also I'm not sure of the oil pressure as its only two gauges - speed fuel and engine temp. ( fuel and engine temp on single gauge)

Edited by WimpyMiniMan, 30 January 2016 - 07:18 PM.


#20 Ethel

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Posted 31 January 2016 - 12:15 PM

An oil pressure gauge is useful. The clutch/ load combo suggests engine mountings 'n steadies, but there are many other possibilities.



#21 WimpyMiniMan

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Posted 31 January 2016 - 03:54 PM

When I get round to restoring the car I was thinking of putting one in.



#22 Alex_B

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Posted 31 January 2016 - 05:41 PM

When I get round to restoring the car I was thinking of putting one in.

It only takes half an hour to fit one and they aren't very expensive. Will help show how healthy the engine is and whether or not you need to perform a full rebuild. So good value for money if you ask me! 



#23 WimpyMiniMan

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Posted 31 January 2016 - 06:15 PM

 

When I get round to restoring the car I was thinking of putting one in.

It only takes half an hour to fit one and they aren't very expensive. Will help show how healthy the engine is and whether or not you need to perform a full rebuild. So good value for money if you ask me! 

 

could you possibly put a link to one you would recommend?



#24 Alex_B

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Posted 31 January 2016 - 06:40 PM

 

 

When I get round to restoring the car I was thinking of putting one in.

It only takes half an hour to fit one and they aren't very expensive. Will help show how healthy the engine is and whether or not you need to perform a full rebuild. So good value for money if you ask me! 

 

could you possibly put a link to one you would recommend?

 

Any that are of decent quality, I got one free with a project but a Smiths mechanical oil pressure gauge would do the job and likely fit with current dials. 

You can get cheaper ones, you can get more expensive ones. Then use a "t-piece" that minispares will sell, to allow you to fit both the standard oil pressure warning light sensor and the gauge piping to the engine. Fits on the front left of the engine and is 5 minutes to fit, then run the piping into the car and fit the gauge to a pod or cut a hole in the dash, I personally have mine in a little pod on the steering column cowl. A braided oil line is reccomended over a standard nylon pipe as it gives better resistance to abrasion, but I am using a nylon one and havent had any issues in 2 years of using it, I just ran it through avoiding any sharp edges. 

Heres a cheaper TIM Gauge
http://www.minispare...|Back to search

Or a smiths which looks more "classic" 
http://www.minispare...|Back to search


The TIM appears to come with all the line and fittings, the smiths you will have to buy separately. 







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