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Will The 2030 Ban & Dash To Electric Cars Spell The End For Classics In Uk?


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#1 mab01uk

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Posted 13 December 2020 - 04:49 PM

"With the impending ban on new petrol (and diesel) car sales in 2030 spell the end for classic cars in the UK? Plus a look into the carbon footprint of buying a new electric car in the UK every three years."

 

 

 



#2 MiniMadRacer

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Posted 13 December 2020 - 07:13 PM

The classic car industry in the UK is worth millions if not billions, when you include exportation around the world of parts, but Boris is such a buffoon, I wouldnt put it passed him to kill it, he is trying to kill everything else..



#3 kit352

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Posted 13 December 2020 - 07:40 PM

I see them making it so expensive to own an internal combustion engine that no one will want one.

#4 MiniMadRacer

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Posted 13 December 2020 - 07:46 PM

I think you will be right in "years" to come but the real issue will be "him" killing off cars before they move through the banger phase into the classic... in the 70s and 80s escorts and minis were bangers before they were classics... I can see future classics certainly at risk



#5 r3k1355

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Posted 16 December 2020 - 10:57 AM

Decent classics will remain, those that people genuinely enthuse over.  Lesser stuff is abit more at risk, although they do have some dedicated fans still.

 

Parts might start to become a little harder to find, often lesser models are stripped to provide parts to the real in-demand vehicles.


Edited by r3k1355, 16 December 2020 - 11:00 AM.


#6 unburntfuelinthemorning

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Posted 16 December 2020 - 08:49 PM

It's the future availability of petrol that bothers me.  If these plans do go ahead for 2030 then by 2040 petrol fuelled cars will be becomming obsolete.  If petrol is still available and "allowed" it's likely to be rather pricey and not available at the local Tesco.  Of course it's all speculation until anything actually happens.  I don't know if anyone's noticed that politicians sometimes don't do what they've promised so there's some hope.  Other parts of the world are watering down their "green" commitments so maybe it'll happen here too and give us a reprieve.  Funny thing is it's all been pushed as a need to reduce carbon dioxide emissions but no one seems to mention that we might run out of oil at some point anyway.  Around 1980 Johnny Ball told me that we had twenty years of oil left, forty years later and no one mentions that side of things these days. 

 

Thought I'd better watch the film before typing anymore.  Synthetic fuel is an interesting idea.  Bet it won't be cheap though.  I like his comparison between old cars and mechanical watches.  Also his idea that sports cars can't be electric because they're one dimensional so classics will be sought after for that reason too.  They won't be cheap to buy and run though so hang onto the one you have!



#7 Cooperman

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Posted 18 December 2020 - 09:52 PM

Petrol for classic cars is likely to be available for many, many years to come.

As already stated, it will be expensive, but classics do so few miles and 1000 miles per annum is a lot for a classic.

Most classics do between 20 mpg (think Jag XJ6) and Minis/Imps/Sprites, etc., which do around 40 mpg.

Thus a big car will use 50 gallons a year and a small car 25 gallons. A classic car enthusiast will not be bothered by this.

It is of little matter if petrol costs (at todays currency values) £6 per gallon or £12 per gallon. 

There are few classics used as daily drivers these days and they will not be used as such after around 2030. 

If the last petrol car is sold in December 2029, that car may well last until 2040 or longer.

Diesel will be around for even longer as electric trucks are not part of the 2030 sales ban and the range of electric 40 tonne trucks still has a long way to go (or maybe not a long way!) in terms of battery technology.



#8 IronmanG

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Posted 18 December 2020 - 11:16 PM

I still cant quite get my head around the ban. The necessary infrastructure to charge that many cars is massive.

#9 steeley

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Posted 19 December 2020 - 06:40 AM

all seems a bit nonsensical while airplanes are still flying round the world 

 

I read somewhere a 747 burns 1 gallon of fuel a second - so 10 hour flight = 36000 gallons,

 

its gonna take a while to get through that much in an average family car and even longer in a classic mini 



#10 Cooperman

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Posted 19 December 2020 - 10:20 PM

But in 10 hours a 747 can take around 300 people 5000 miles.

How many Minis does it require to take that number of people that distance and how much petrol would it take?

say 2 people to a Mini, so that is 150 Minis. A Mini will do around 35 mpg. That is around 21,500 gallons of petrol.

Modern airliners are much more fuel-efficient than the old 747 and in 10 hours are likely to use much less than a 747.

Just saying  ;D .

 

Of course, I'm so old that it won't have any impact on me. Really BIG birthday was earlier this month. Now, what shall I do when I grow up?


Edited by Cooperman, 19 December 2020 - 10:27 PM.


#11 steeley

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Posted 20 December 2020 - 06:14 AM

Buy another mini

#12 Bobbins

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Posted 20 December 2020 - 08:52 AM

I still cant quite get my head around the ban. The necessary infrastructure to charge that many cars is massive.


The general infrastructure is already there ... typical 12,000 miles/year equates to 48 miles/day average and that's assuming the car is only used 5 days per week, obviously the daily average is lower if the car is used 7 days. The key is that for vast numbers of people the car can be charged at home or work with a very simple charge box at the property.
Charging is around 4 miles per kw per hour, so even if only plugged into a normal 13A plug at home, ie. no additional kit, an over night charge of 8 hours can put over 100 miles of range back in each night.

The additional infrastructure is needed for extended trips which typically involve the motorway network, hence that is where the infrastructure investment is currently happening.

#13 Ethel

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Posted 20 December 2020 - 11:47 AM

 

I still cant quite get my head around the ban. The necessary infrastructure to charge that many cars is massive.


The general infrastructure is already there ... typical 12,000 miles/year equates to 48 miles/day average and that's assuming the car is only used 5 days per week, obviously the daily average is lower if the car is used 7 days. The key is that for vast numbers of people the car can be charged at home or work with a very simple charge box at the property.
Charging is around 4 miles per kw per hour, so even if only plugged into a normal 13A plug at home, ie. no additional kit, an over night charge of 8 hours can put over 100 miles of range back in each night.

The additional infrastructure is needed for extended trips which typically involve the motorway network, hence that is where the infrastructure investment is currently happening.

 

 

If everyone had a drive & just one car to put on it.

 

When  you got home on a Sunday evening, from a weekend outing that drained your batteries, you'd probably want rather more assurance than 100 miles range for Monday morning. Most will want 30amp charging as a minimum and won't be allowed it, in a good number of cases, without some modification to their supply.

 

Everyone needing to visit the motorway services for half an hour will be "interesting" too. On the plus side, taking the train instead will be more appealing.



#14 IronmanG

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Posted 20 December 2020 - 01:32 PM

I still cant quite get my head around the ban. The necessary infrastructure to charge that many cars is massive.

The general infrastructure is already there ... typical 12,000 miles/year equates to 48 miles/day average and that's assuming the car is only used 5 days per week, obviously the daily average is lower if the car is used 7 days. The key is that for vast numbers of people the car can be charged at home or work with a very simple charge box at the property.
Charging is around 4 miles per kw per hour, so even if only plugged into a normal 13A plug at home, ie. no additional kit, an over night charge of 8 hours can put over 100 miles of range back in each night.

The additional infrastructure is needed for extended trips which typically involve the motorway network, hence that is where the infrastructure investment is currently happening.

The infrastructure is not there.
You are banking on the current grid being able to supply millions of extra amps.
In crawley for example a lot of people dont have the ability to park on a drive or even in some cases near there own house. I have a van and a car. I have a drive for 1 vehicle. Hopefully we can park somewhere with the second vehicle. If I cant charge my vehicle using my own off peak electricity supply at 5 p a kWh why should I use a generic charger fitted by the council which I can guarantee will be 20p kWh.
Electric is for people with their own drive, doing urban mileage, and charging facilities at home.
The infrastructure for anything more than that is simply not available within 10 to 15 years.
I am a sparky. It would take every sparky in the country working 24 7 decades to get where we need to be

#15 sonikk4

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Posted 20 December 2020 - 02:28 PM

Even with the "current" no pun intended crop of chargers around the country, half of them do not work. So trying to realistically do a long journey on the off chance on your planned route there will be working chargers is a gamble.

 

Not so bad for Tesla's as they appear to be kept in good working order but then how many of us ca afford a new Tesla??

 

As Ironman G has said until the infrastructure is fully in place its a bit of a pipe dream at this point in time.






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