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Kws's Mini 1000

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#76 kws

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 08:40 AM

Its play in the end of the rack, not the tie rod end. I clarified that with the inspector as i was hoping it was just the tie rod end.

 

Part number 7, which Minispares lists as NLA
Xl6IlXN.jpg



#77 Chris.Williams

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 05:48 PM

Oh yeah ok, new rack then.
Bonus, it will be very nice to drive once done..... **** of a job but.

#78 Wiggy

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 02:02 PM

And fix the brake imbalance (LH 10% / RH 93% - Almost nothing from the left), which may be the hard one to do. I don't recall any obvious leaking etc when i last removed the drums, so will strip both down, clean the lot, and replace the rear hoses when I remove the arms. Hopefully there is something obvious that needs to be replaced.


Likely to be a seized slave cylinder. Easy to change.

#79 kws

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 07:59 AM

 

And fix the brake imbalance (LH 10% / RH 93% - Almost nothing from the left), which may be the hard one to do. I don't recall any obvious leaking etc when i last removed the drums, so will strip both down, clean the lot, and replace the rear hoses when I remove the arms. Hopefully there is something obvious that needs to be replaced.
 


Likely to be a seized slave cylinder. Easy to change.

 

 

I hope so. Having not really done too much with drum brakes, other than overhauling the front ones, is testing the wheel cylinder as easy as just moving the piston and seeing how free it moves?



#80 Wiggy

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 11:50 AM

Take the drum off and get someone to push the brakes gently and slowly. Will be obvious if it isn't moving properly. It's about the only thing, apart from poor adjustment or worn out shoes, that can be wrong.

Take a snap of where the springs locate before you take the shoes off. Makes life much easier.

The only hard part is fitting the new clip on the back of the slave. Can be a sod.

#81 kws

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Posted 17 October 2018 - 07:57 AM

As the first step to sorting out the issues needed to get Snicket on the road, I decided to remove the radius arms, so it also knocks out two jobs in one.
 
I had suspected there may be some play in the rear arms, as when taking a corner hard, the inside rear edge of the tire would often make contact with the body... and it shouldn't be able to do that. They also look super old and crusty.
 
The first thing to do was to whip the wheel off, and check out the "soft suspension" that was noted. You can also see on the right of the photo, where the tire has rubbed the inner guard.
DSC03363.jpg
 
I think I found why it failed on it...
 
The shocks have leaked all their oil out, and are doing nothing. The other side was worse! Ok, so that's fair enough.
 
Next was to remove the drum and inspect the LH brake, which was the one noted as doing nothing. I backed the adjuster right off and pulled off the drum
DSC03364.jpg
 
There is a bit of grease on the hub, but nothing inside the drum. The shoes are showing weird markings, but could just be because they havent been used in anger for a while.
DSC03365.jpg
 
No obvious signs of brake fluid leaks from the cylinder. As a test I set my camera up and checked what happens when I put my foot on the brake, without the drum on. I should have seen the shoes get pushed out by the cylinder... but I had nothing. Not a mm of movement. Guess that's that; the cylinder is seized.
 
I took the dust cap off, and I'm sure it's not meant to look this grotty
DSC03372.jpg
 
Moving along, I proceeded to disassemble the arm for removal.
 
Disconnect the brake lines from the hose. From left to right, is the fixed nut on the hose, bracket on arm, star washer, locking nut to secure hose to bracket, and then the brake pipe nut.
DSC03373.jpg
 
Removing the shocks was next. For the LH side I had to move the fuel tank to access the shock, which was a pain. Also found more surface rust, which I brushed back and treated (looks worse in the photo than it is). I used my cordless ratchet to spin the nut off
DSC03376.jpg
 
But like most shocks, the shaft will try to spin, so I used a pair of vice grips to lock it in place. Worked like a charm
DSC03377.jpg
 
The shocks when removed offer almost no resistance to being moved by hand.
 
Since the arm can now drop right down, I removed the trumpet and cone. On this side I had to use some percussive persuasion with BFH to free the cone from the trumpet, but it was only stuck there, not seized, so didn't take much. The other side came apart easy.
DSC03378.jpg
 
Somewhere in here I removed, but forgot to get photos of, the hand brake quadrant. It's on the underside of the arm, and in the left of the photo above with the cable running to it. Mine was held in place by a split pin, onto a pin that goes through the arm. You also need to remove the cable from the bracket on the backing plate of the brakes (and from the lever, just a split pin and remove the pin). Do this by levering the metal collar with the spring, out of the tab on the arm and pulling the cable free.
 
Next I removed the brake hose from the bracket on the subframe, and from the pipe. This is not fun to access, but can be done. I have replacement hoses which will be fitted on reassembly.
DSC03388.jpg
 
With the hose out of the way, there is a large nut on the side of the subframe that needs to be removed
DSC03379.jpg
 
And another on the outside of the subframe, where the grease nipple is. I have also loosened one of the outer mounting bolts in this photo, above the arm.
DSC03381.jpg
 
Another bolt is hidden under the arm
DSC03383.jpg
 
Then there are another two under the bracket, and once removed, the arm can be pulled free from the car
DSC03382.jpg
 
My arm is pretty grotty. Old grease, dirt, and what I think is a Lanolin based rust protectant.
DSC03384.jpg
DSC03385.jpg
 
The other side is the same deal, and took me about quarter the time to remove that the first one did, but with one little catch. The brake splitter is close to the RH side, so the brake pipe is very short. There is very little movement in it, so to access the nut on the side of the subframe I needed to remove the bolt holding the splitter to the bracket, and gain some space. You could also just remove the pipe from the splitter, which is probably better, but I didn't want to risk rounding the nut. It looked old.
DSC03389.jpg
 
This side was worse when the arm was removed
DSC03391.jpg
 
I'm going to have to chip all that out before I refit the refurbished arms. Oh well.
 
So the arms are out, I have ordered two new brake cylinders (RH side cylinder didn't look any better, so doing both) and a new set of shoes. I'll be dropping the arms into the local Mini specialist to have him fit the rebuild kit, as I don't have the tools to ream the new bushing out, and I'll get him to fit the new brake cylinders too. Once they are done and back I can reassemble the rear, and start work on the front.


#82 kws

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Posted 17 October 2018 - 07:59 AM

Take the drum off and get someone to push the brakes gently and slowly. Will be obvious if it isn't moving properly. It's about the only thing, apart from poor adjustment or worn out shoes, that can be wrong.

Take a snap of where the springs locate before you take the shoes off. Makes life much easier.

The only hard part is fitting the new clip on the back of the slave. Can be a sod.

 

You get the virtual cookie, the cylinder is seized as a stuck thing  :highfive:



#83 kws

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Posted 23 October 2018 - 08:35 PM

Since I was at a standstill with the rear of car due to waiting for the rear arms to be reconditioned, I decided to push on with the front of the car.
 
 
Referring back to the Rego inspection sheet, up front I had play in the front lower LH "kingpin" (lower ball joint), and play in the RH rack end. I ordered a replacement standard steering rack (I considered a quick rack, but apparently they can make the car too twitchy to drive normally and it's not like the standard rack is slow) and a pair of ball joints.
 
I had been procrastinating the rack replacement as everything I had read indicated that it's a complete arse of a job. "Step 1, lower the front subframe". Yeah.
 
Anyway, yesterday I bit the bullet and got stuck in.
 
The first job to do is to get inside the car, and remove the column pinch bolt. Remove the nut, and then use a flatblade screwdriver to open the gap on the clamp up a little and the bolt should come out fairly easily.
DSC03393.jpg
 
I also loosened off the upper column clamp. This is meant to have a headless shear-bolt, but in typical Leyland fashion mine wasn't sheared off. The head of the bolt is the orange arrow, and it screws into the blue arrow. The "nut" on the end is weird, it free spins and doesn't lock into anything. I used a screwdriver jammed into the slot to jam it and undo it.
DSC03397-1.jpg
 
Next it was time to crack off the nuts inside the car that hold the U clamps to the rack. There are two on each side of the floor. Blue arrows are the nuts. Orange arrow is the hole in the panel to access the centering hole in the rack.
 DSC03394-1.jpg
DSC03395-1.jpg
 
With them cracked off, but not too loose, it's time to get ready to lower the subframe.
 
Undo the top nuts for the shocks, and remove the shocks from the mount
DSC03403.jpg
 
And remove the tie rod ends from the knuckles
DSC03400.jpg
 
Now to drop the subframe. I left the front mounts done up (its rubber mounted on my car so has some give), and removed the four nuts and bolts on the lower rear mounts
DSC03401.jpg
 
I supported the engine with my jack and some wood, and then removed the two massive top mount bolts. This allowed me to gently pry the back of the subframe down and get the much needed clearance. I did also lower the shifter box from the floor (two nuts inside the car behind shifter), otherwise there isn't enough clearance to slide the rack passed the rods. The manual says you only need to gain 20mm of space, but I had to lever it down as far as it would physically go, and even then it's just enough.
 
The four nuts inside the car hold the rack in place, so remove those and then the U bolts can be removed from under the car
DSC03409.jpg
 
And then with some wiggling, out comes the rack (I hadn't lowered the shifter box yet, so it pulled the boot off during removal) from the drivers side.
DSC03404.jpg
 
The rack is completely covered in oil/grease, and the rack ends are quite floppy. Compared to the new one, it looks very grotty
DSC03412.jpg
 
I filled the new rack up with some differential oil (there is a lot of discussion regarding what should be in these; grease or oil, but as I had oil on hand, and the rack was completely dry, it's what went in it). You fill the rack via this port, which is also the centering hole for the rack. Its usually got a black plastic plug screwed into it, which can be seen in the photo above
DSC03407.jpg
 
And then with the help of my lovely wife, I carefully slid the new rack into place, and secured with the U bolts. I cleaned the grease off the bolts and replaced the plastic strips. It's a two person job for sure, as one person needs to push the U bolts through the holes, and the other needs to spin the nuts on to hold it in place. Do NOT tighten the U bolts up yet through, leave them loose enough to be able to move the rack.
DSC03411.jpg
 
With the rack in place, I used the jack to carefully raise the subframe back up, and refit all the bolts and secure it. I was planning on reusing both tie rod ends, but unfortunately one was damaged during removal. A replacement is on its way, and one has been reused. I counted the turns during removal, and refitted the same amount of turns, so hopefully the alignment won't be too far out. Will get it aligned anyway, but need to drive it there.
DSC03415.jpg
 
So, whilst waiting for the replacement tie rod end to arrive, I looked into the ball joint play. This is what I found.
 
So, the whole damn joint is loose and moving on the knuckle. Thankfully the locking tab did its job and stopped it coming completely out and falling to bits. Yes, that is also water coming out of the boot. I think the fail was fair.
 
I was intending to replace this with the hub on the car, but knowing what I know now, that would be a huge pain to do, so I removed the hub from the car. Having to spin the whole hub assembly around to undo the brake line sucks, but I couldn't be bothered stripping the hub to remove the cylinder and spin that off.
DSC03416.jpg
 
I was also only intending to replace the lower joint, but the top joint turned out to have miles to play in it, so that was getting replaced too.
 
I don't have many photos of this process because it's very messy, but once I had the hub on the workbench I hammered back the locking tab, and used a massive socket to remove the dome nut. The grease in both joints was bad. Almost looked like grinding paste.
DSC03417.jpg
 
I cleaned up the hub, and noticed a couple of rough spots which I cleaned up with fine sandpaper. Then it was a matter of refitting. Getting the shims right was a real pain, but trial and error got there eventually, so that the amount of play in the joints was just right. There are plenty of videos on YouTube of how to do this, so I wont go into too much detail.
 
New joints look good though. I need to get more grease to pump through the fittings, and tighten the hub nut, but otherwise that is another job done.
DSC03419.jpg
 
The last job for the day was to center the rack, and reinstall the column. To center the rack, remove the plastic plug discussed above, and use a 5-6mm drill bit, and a mirror, and whilst someone slowly turns the rack from either lock, look for the hole in the rack and slip the drill bit in. This is dead center on the rack.
DSC03421.jpg
 
As there is only one spot on the rack pinion for the pinch bolt to fit, the column can only be fitted in one way. Keep in mind the rack MUST still be loose in the U bolts for this, so you can tilt the rack up for down to align the pinion. Turn the wheel so the pinch bolt hole lines up with the notch on the rack pinion, and slip the column onto the splines. It should slip on easily, if it doesn't, try to change the angle of the rack up or down to make it a straight line with the column. Next try to slip the pinch bolt through. If you have the column lined up well, it should slip through without too much issue. If it doesn't, take the column off the splines and turn the wheel to align the notch and try again.
 
Unfortunately after all this, because the column could only go in one spot, my steering wheel is rather out of alignment. I'll need to take the wheel off and reinstall it straight.
DSC03422.jpg
 
Tomorrow morning I drop the arms in for reconditioning, and then its a case of building it all back up, reinstalling everything, bleeding the brakes, and it should be ready for the re-check.


#84 kws

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Posted 31 October 2018 - 06:04 AM

My recheck is booked for Wednesday, so with limited time to get it all sorted, I got the Mini back together.
 
 
We left off the steering rack reinstalled, waiting on a new tie rod end, and about to have my rear radius arms inspected and reconditioned.
 
The tie rod end arrived, so that went in and for the first time I could spin the wheel lock to lock on my new steering rack. It's a bit notchy as it hasn't worn in, but has no play in it at all. Should be fun.
 
Having the tie rod end installed also allowed me to remove the steering wheel and reposition it so it isn't crooked. During testing I confirmed the alignment is way off, but I'll try to get that sorted Wednesday morning.
 
Now.... the arms. So, remember that VTNZ failed my rear arms on having "excessive play". I dropped the arms in to the local Mini specialist, P D Automotive, and intended to have them recondition the arms with new pins/bushes, and fit new brake cylinders. They gave me a call the next day and basically told me that VTNZ are talking out their backside, because the arms have had new pins fitted recently, and there is little to no wear and certainly no play in the pins.
 
They gave the arms a quick clean, removed the old nylon cups and fitted the new wheel cylinders to them and I picked them up ready to refit.
 
Before fitting the arms I needed to remove the old joints from the ends of the trumpet and fit new ones. Mine were well seized into the trumpets, but I used a long screwdriver (longer than the trumpet) down the middle of the trumpet to drift it out, by bashing the end of the screwdriver against the concrete floor. Not a glamorous way to do it, but it worked.
 IMG_2279.jpg
IMG_2280.jpg
IMG_2281.jpg 
 
Fitting the new ones was a bit harder. I cleaned the hole they fit into, and using copper grease and WD40, carefully bashed them into the trumpet with a dead blow hammer, padding it with a rag. Remove the nylon cup first.
IMG_2283.jpg
 
Refitting the radius arms isn't rocket surgery, the pin goes into a hole in the subframe, and into a bracket that gets bolted onto the outside of the subframe. The hardest bit is keeping the oil seal on each end in place over the thrust washer and arm, and not having it pop out.
DSC03423.jpg
 
Having a cordless ratchet was amazing for this job, as I could hold the arm with one hand, start a bolt with the other hand and then spin the bolt in with the cordless ratchet. If you didn't have one (but you should have), a second person to hold the arm up would work too. It's not light.
 
In went the trumpet with new joint and the old cone. I used copper grease on the face where the trumpet and cone meet, so they don't seize together.
DSC03424.jpg
 
The shock holds everything in place by limiting travel of the arm. I'm using a pair of the cheaper oil filled KYB shocks. Still better than the failed old ones, but not as good as the more expensive gas shocks. To fit the shock, slip it onto the stud on the arm first, and then extend the shock up into the arch. Fit the washer and bush and guide it into the arch hole. Now, holding the shock up with one hand, use your other hand inside the boot to slip the other bush, washer and then nut on top. I did the top nut up as far as I could with my cordless ratchet, and then gave it a final tighten by hand, as you need a tiny spanner on the top of the shaft to keep it from spinning.
DSC03425.jpg
 
Now that the arm was in place and being held by the shock, it was time to start refitting the brakes on this side.
 
First the new hose went in. I transferred the locking nut and washer over from the old hose, with a good helping of copper grease on the threads. The hardline to the cylinder was fitted next. I found it easiest to fit it into the cylinder first, loosely, and then fit it to the hose. Doing it the other way around limits movement to align the smaller fitting on the cylinder. Keeping the hose lock nut loose so the hose and move around a bit helps too.
DSC03426.jpg
 
Speaking of cylinders, here's a nice new one. I confirmed the old ones were buggered by trying to turn the piston with a screwdriver. Its easy on the new ones (has to be, so you can line the slots up with the shoes), but none of the old ones would turn.
DSC03427.jpg
 
Next I removed, cleaned and greased the adjuster screw and blocks. It's a very simple system, which would work well, if it had the means to auto adjust, but since it doesn't, it needs almost constant manual adjustment. The system works by screwing the screw in and out to push the blocks out. If you wind the screw completely out, the blocks aren't pushing on the shoes
DSC03428.jpg
 
But you can see as the blocks move up the taper, by screwing the screw in (the blocks are held in place and can only move in and out). This pushes the blocks out further, which pushes the shoes out and closer to the drum
DSC03429.jpg
 
You can also see that the taper isn't just a cone, it's actually squared off, which means there is some fine adjustment by turning the screw just a little bit either way off the flat. Moving off the flat, the rounded edges push the blocks out further again.
 
I refitted the adjuster, and moved to the other side to refit the arm. Before I could though, I had to clear some grot out of the subframe. It was a combination of grease, dirt, and who knows what else. I started with this.
DSC03391.jpg
 
And using a couple of large screwdrivers and a shop vac, I chipped away at it
DSC03430.jpg
 
I found some surface rust under it all, so a brushed it back and sprayed on some rust converter before refitting the arm. Refitting was the same as the other side, but a lot quicker this time. Refitting the hand brake cable spring to the back plate sucks, but can be done with some brute force.
DSC03434.jpg
 
I repeated the cleaning and greasing of the adjuster on this side too before fitting. Next was to fit the new shoes. Make sure your hands/gloves are free from grease, and refit the same way they came off. Take note of where the springs hook into, and which way around the shoes go. Each shoe has a leading (longer gap from the end of the metal shoe to the friction lining) and trailing edge (short gap from edge to lining) which needs be fitted the correct way around. The green arrows indicate direction of travel for the wheel when driving forward. The orange arrows show where the leading edges should be on the shoes.
DSC03436-1.jpg
 
And on goes the drum. The drums were in decent shape, so I gave them a degrease and clean and reused them. I probably should have given the insides a light sanding to help bed the shoes in, but too late now.
DSC03437.jpg
 
The other side was the same process
DSC03438.jpg
 
Next was bleeding all four brakes. I have explained this is a previous post so I followed the same instructions and got as much air out as I could myself, but found that I could only get it all out with a helper holding pressure on the pedal as I opened the valve.
DSC03439.jpg
 
I took the car out for a quick drive and it did not feel good at all. I think it was a combination of the alignment being too far out, the wheel bearing being a little on the loose side, and the shoes bedding in and being out of adjustment. I went back into the garage and tended to everything I thought it could be, and the car was much better to drive. The alignment was obviously still well out, but I'll get it properly aligned to fix that.
 
The rear was the biggest difference though, going over bumps before, the whole car would bounce back and forth, now the rear is solid and going over bumps isn't an issue. The steering feels very tight and very direct with the new rack.
 
So, other than the alignment, we are ready for the recheck.


#85 kws

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Posted 31 October 2018 - 06:08 AM

Today was the day; Recheck day.
 
 
 
Everything had been building up to today. All the work done, all the money spent, it all comes down to a pass or fail today.
 
First thing I needed to do was get the alignment sorted. I had booked for an alignment first thing this morning, so that I would have ample time to get that done and still make it to my recheck booking. They got onto it straight away
IMG_2288.jpg
 
And within no time, I had this sheet in my hands
IMG_2289.jpg
 
Yes, that is 21.5mm total front toe, when it should be 1mm total! No wonder it was scrubbing the front tires hard. With that sorted, the car drives much nicer now, and the steering wheel is finally straight when driving.
 
After the alignment I shot home and refitted the front carpet. Its torn and ugly, but looks better than the bare floors. Remember, I'm trying to make an impression so the inspector plays nice ;)
 
I hooned in for my appointment. This confirms my suspicion that the car doesn't really suit 100kph motorways. It gets to, and holds, that speed OK, but it's pulling almost 4000rpm and there is some tasty shaking at times. Need to check the wheels for balance, which I may do next week. I suspect it's out. I may even paint the wheels while I have them off as they are a bit rusty.
 
Looks good just sitting there
IMG_2291.jpg
 
I went away and killed some time and when I returned, lo and behold, this happened
 IMG_2292.jpg
IMG_2293.jpg
 
For the first time since 2012, Snicket is road legal! With the standard black plates still!
 
This was a car that when I got it, barely ran, had no brakes, had no lights, leaked oil a lot, various things were loose and missing, and had been used as a parts mule. Now it runs like a champ, it's great fun to drive, and best of all, it's a viable classic car again. Others would have just scrapped it and we would be short one more awesome classic Mini, but now it's actually worth investing time and money into, and being able to enjoy it.
 
I drove home the back way, arm out the window, enjoying the wind in my hair and the sun on my face, whilst listening to the sweet sound of a 998cc A Series purring away. I couldn't help but stop and grab a couple of quick pictures
 
GzSHhDz.jpg
l8Kb4tF.jpg
v7W5XfU.jpg
ycUuo92.jpg
 
It's a great little car, and though for what I have spent I could have purchased a tidier one that was already on the road, I wouldn't have been able to save this car.


#86 timmy850

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Posted 31 October 2018 - 06:41 AM

Excellent work!

 

You'll soon get used to the noise at 100kph, mine does over 4000rpm on the highway and will hold that for hours! 



#87 kws

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Posted 31 October 2018 - 06:56 AM

The shaking is the biggest issue on the open road atm. At around 90-110kph it can feel like the car is about to come apart. Need to see if its the wheels out of balance. Hell, it could even be the tires out of round from being old.


Edited by kws, 31 October 2018 - 06:56 AM.


#88 Vinay-RS

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Posted 31 October 2018 - 07:43 AM

Congrats on getting it back on the road. Enjoy it :) 



#89 timmy850

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Posted 31 October 2018 - 08:46 AM

I had a problem with my steel wheels being out of round. You could see them wobble when you spun them, and when coating to a stop the car would jig up and down







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