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Engine Water Ways Rusty - How To Clean?

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#1 Minitransition

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 08:23 PM

Cleaning up and decoking a 44k 998cc auto engine. 

 

Not wanting to strip it to the block I need to clean out rusty waterways while the engine is out of the car. Suggestions on best way to do it please?

 

Thanks Andrew



#2 KernowCooper

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 09:31 PM

Difficult to do out the car other than having the block dipped, I used to have a Maching made by Wynns Called the Radflush, you connected up hoses to the rad and heater pipes in series warmed the vehicle up and put in the wynns Radflush which was caustic based and circulated it round then back flushed it out, you can do the same with Rad Flush and back flushing the system, but you need to reassembled to do that.

Edited by KernowCooper, 21 October 2015 - 09:31 PM.


#3 fenghuang

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 10:21 PM

Dow good is Radflush at cleaning out rust from the water jacket?

#4 KernowCooper

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 10:26 PM

Its caustic based so seems to clean out a lot of crud

#5 Spider

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Posted 21 October 2015 - 11:54 PM

Go to the Hardware and get some CLR, there's nothing in it that should hurt any part of the cooling system, it's fairly effective, but if it's choked bad, it will need professional cleaning.

 

http://www.amazon.co...m/dp/B007RFQ38Y

 

Be careful if using anything caustic in the cooling system, your thermostat housing and water pump (and alloy radiator) will disappear fairly quickly!


Edited by Moke Spider, 21 October 2015 - 11:54 PM.


#6 dklawson

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Posted 22 October 2015 - 12:15 PM

+1 for Spider's recommendation.  CLR is largely phosphoric acid.  I have used it to clean blocks on a couple of engines. Best to remove the thermostat to eliminate trapped air, and keep the hoses attached and held "high" so you can keep all the surfaces in the water jacket wetted.  Allow the CLR time to work.  No rust or crud remover will be instant.



#7 ryomini

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Posted 22 October 2015 - 01:16 PM

A dismantled engine could be cleaned by electrolysis - results are very clean

flushing and soaking with white vinegar is a cheap but effective alternative if not left to soak too long and only for the steel parts



#8 FlyingScot

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Posted 22 October 2015 - 01:43 PM

CLR is actually mainly lactic acid and is stronger than acetic (vinegar).
A good alternative which I have used for many cleaning/ derusting duties is citric acid which you can buy in powdered form in wine/beer making places. I find it easier to make up as needed with hot water and it doesn't smell like vinegar does!

FS

Edited by FlyingScot, 22 October 2015 - 01:44 PM.
http://www.jelmar.com/msds/2015/CLR_SDS_520315_3-17-15.pdf


#9 Spider

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Posted 22 October 2015 - 06:21 PM

A dismantled engine could be cleaned by electrolysis - results are very clean

flushing and soaking with white vinegar is a cheap but effective alternative if not left to soak too long and only for the steel parts

 

A mate of mine does that with his tractor parts and the results are very good.



#10 dklawson

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Posted 22 October 2015 - 07:18 PM

Flying Scott, I stand corrected.  I have used both CLR and phosphoric acid for cleaning rust and just assumed CLR had the same basic ingredients.  My mistake.

 

Electrolysis can work very well at de-rusting parts.  I have used it on several items that would have been ruined using other methods.  The only problem with using it to clean a water jacket is that it is an electrical process which works preferentially by line-of-sight.  To get good results in the nooks and crannies of a water jacket you will need to make electrodes that can reach back into the corners and still be insulated on their sides/length so they don't short out to the block.



#11 limby2000

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Posted 23 October 2015 - 06:59 AM

Hi Minitransition, had my 998 auto with 56,thousand miles rebored recently by Gosnay,s at romford. I removed coreplugs prior to dropping off block. When I got it back I was dissapointed that the chemical wash, which had cleaned alot had,nt touch the old rusty crud inside the water jacket. I ended up spending a couple of hours with a long thin screwdriver manually scrapping it out, which was very effective,although easy without head and coreplugs. Did,nt think of using electrolosis as someone else said,have used it my self for rusty parts, just need a charger and sodium carbonate.

#12 dklawson

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Posted 23 October 2015 - 12:11 PM

Footnote on sodium carbonate:  If you are having trouble finding sodium carbonate in a store, you can take regular sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) and bake it for about 1/2 hour to change it to sodium carbonate.  (Exact times and temperatures are on the net).

 

Another way to get into the nooks and crannies of the block is to cut a short length of steel cable (perhaps 12 to 16") and split one end into individual strands for a length of 1 to 2 inches.  Chuck the other end of the cable in an electric drill.  Wet the water jacket with your preferred strong cleaner, feed the cable through any available hole, and use the drill to spin the cable.  The free end of the cable will mechanically beat the rust, scale, and deposits.  This will make it easier to wash out a lot of the trapped crud.



#13 fenghuang

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Posted 23 October 2015 - 12:39 PM

... Another way to get into the nooks and crannies ... short length of steel cable ... split one end into individual strands ... electric drill.  ... mechanically beat the rust, scale, ... wash out a lot of the trapped crud.

Presumably that can be done with the engine in situ?
And can be done to the head too?
I'm struling to think where to source appropriate cable. Any suggestions?

Edited by fenghuang, 23 October 2015 - 12:40 PM.


#14 ryomini

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Posted 23 October 2015 - 01:39 PM

As for the cable an old bicycle should have a few that you could salvage

I saw one Australian person uses Molasses to great effect, he leaves stuff soaking for a week at a time

his wife complains of the putrescent odour (diluted 1 part molasses to 10 parts water)

 

not so much rust as cleaning up aluminium there are some who boil things in ethylene glycol (gotta love the name alone)



#15 dklawson

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Posted 23 October 2015 - 01:41 PM

I suppose you could use the cable to remove carbon from the combustion chambers... but I would not.  I wouldn't want to risk doing any damage to the spark plug holes and you would have to make sure both valves in each cylinder were closed before using the cable.  You wouldn't want to risk damaging the valves or valve seats.  The cable idea is really aimed at cleaning the water jacket.

 

I cannot advise you on where to buy cable.  I am a bit too far away.  However, I would check the rope department in your nearest DIY center.

 

EDIT:

Ethylene glycol is antifreeze.  Soaking things in it may soften deposits but it's not really a cleaner.  It certainly will not clean the water jacket.  Ethylene glycol is what was in the water jacket when the deposits formed.

The cables I am talking about are MUCH larger than what a bicycle would use.  Think 3/16" or 5mm diameter.


Edited by dklawson, 23 October 2015 - 01:45 PM.






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